English Words of (Unexpected) Greek Origin.

Learn easily Greek using the roots of the English words.

Posts Tagged ‘greek language’

Etymology of camera

Posted by Johannes on 2 June 2012

The word camera (a device that records and stores images; vaulted building), comes from the Latin camera (vaulted room), which is a transliteration of the Greek word camara (a vault, arched roof or ceiling, vaulted chamber; room). The word was also used as a short for camera obscura (dark chamber; a black box with a lens that could project images of external objects), and thus it became the word for “picture-taking device”.

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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) camera: camera [Gr: κάμερα; loanword]
b) camara: arch, arcade [Gr: καμάρα]
c) camara: room [Gr: κάμαρα]

d) camariera: chambermaid [Gr: καμαριέρα]
e) camarini: dressing room, green room [Gr: καμαρίνι]

 

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Etymology of carrot

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The word carrot comes from the old French carrotte, from the Latin carota, which is a transliteration of the Greek caroton (carrot; Gr: καρωτόν).

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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):

a) caroto: carrot [Gr: καρώτο]

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From the same root: carotene, carotenoids

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Post 209. 

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Etymology of one

Posted by Johannes on 10 December 2011

The word one comes from the Latin unus, which in turn derives from the Greek oenos [one, ace in dice; Gr: οινός].
Note: Some etymologize unus from the gen. enos of eis [one; Gr: εις].

From the same root: unity, unique.

In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) enas:
one [Gr: ένας]
b) enotita: unity [Gr: ενότητα]
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Etymology of dime

Posted by Johannes on 30 August 2011

The word dime (coin worth one tenth of a US dollar, a 10 cent coin) comes from the old French disme (a tenth part), from the Latin decima [tenth (part)], from decem (ten), from the Greek deca (ten). See also “etymology of dean” here .
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Etymology of mandolin

Posted by Johannes on 30 August 2011

Mandolin comes from the French mandoline, from the Italian mandolino, diminutive of mandola, a larger kind of mandolin, altered from the Latin pandura (a three-stringed lute), which is transliteration of the Greek pandura. See also post 186 (etymology of banjo).


In modern Greek (Romeika):

a) mandolino: mandolin [Gr: μαντολίνο; loanword]
Post 187.
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http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=mandolin&searchmode=none

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Etymology of misery

Posted by Johannes on 20 March 2011

Origin of the word misery
The word misery comes from the French miserie from the Latin miseria (wretchedness) from miser (wretched), which is a transliteration of the Greek miseros/misaros (abominable, despicable, wretched; Gr: μυσαρός) from misos (evrything that cause abhorrence, repulsion, revulsion; Gr: μύσος).
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From the same root:
English: miserable, miser, miserly
French: misere, miserable, miserieux, misericorde, miserere
Italian: miseria, misere, miserabile, misericordia, misserimo
Spanish: miseria, misero, miserable, misericordia, miserere
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In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) mizeria: misery [Gr: μιζέρια; loanword]
b) mizeros: miserable, wretched [Gr: μίζερος]
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Etymology of salary

Posted by Johannes on 17 March 2011

Origin of the word salary

Salary derives from the French salarie from the Latin salarium (salary, stipend, originally soldier’s allowance for the purchase of salt) from sal (salt), which comes from the Greek als (salt; Gr: άλς).
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From the same root: salt, salad, salami
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In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) alas or alati: salt [Gr: άλας or αλάτι]
b) salata: salad [Gr: σαλάτα]
c) salami: salami [Gr: σαλάμι]

 

Post: 173

 

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Etymology of cinnamon

Posted by Johannes on 27 February 2011

Origin of the word cinnamon

The word cinnamon comes from the old French cinnamone from the Latin cinnamomum/cinnamum (cinnamon) [also used as a term of endearment], which is a transliteration of the Greek cinnamomon (cinnamon; Gr.: κιννάμωμον).
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Post 169.
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Etymology of chop (to cut)

Posted by Johannes on 27 February 2011

Origin of the word chop (to cut)
Τhe word chop (to cut) comes from the old French coper (to cut, cut off), which, most probably, is derived from the Greek verb copto (to cut; Gr: κόπτω).

In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) copto or covo: to cut [Gr.: κόπτω or κόβω]
b) copi: cutting [Gr.: κοπή]

Post 168

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Etymology of chameleon

Posted by Johannes on 19 February 2011

Origin of the word chameleon
The word chameleon comes from the Latin chamaeleon, which is a transliteration of the Greek chamaileon from chamai (on the ground; Gr: χαμαί] + leon [lion; Gr: λέων].

In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) hameleon: chameleon [Gr: χαμαιλέων]
b) hamo: on the ground [Gr: χάμω]
c) leon or liontari: lion [Gr: λέων or λιοντάρι]
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Post: 165
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