ENGLISH WORDS AND GREEK COGNATES.

Learn easily Greek via the linguistic relationships and the roots of the English words.

Archive for January, 2011

Etymology of cheap

Posted by Johannes on 29 January 2011

Origin of the word cheap
The word cheap comes from the old English ceap (n.; traffic, bargain, a purchase) from the Germanic ceapian (v.; trade) from the Latin caupo (gen. cauponis; petty tradesman, huckster), which is related to the Greek capilos (synonym to caupo; vintner, huckster, petty tradesman; Gr: κάπηλος]

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In modern Greek:
a) capilos: huckster, monger [Gr: κάπηλος]
b) capilio: wineshop, pothouse [Gr: καπηλειό]
c) capilia: exploitation, trading (on sth) [Gr: καπηλεία]

WKN

OED

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Etymology of camomile

Posted by Johannes on 23 January 2011

Origin of the word camomile

The word camomile comes from the French camomille from the Latin chamoemelon, which is a transliteration of the Greek chamaimelon [camomile, lit. earth-apple; Gr.: χαμαίμηλον] from chamai (on the ground; Gr: χαμαί) + melon (apple; Gr: μήλον). So called because of the apple-like scent of the plant.

In modern Greek:
a) hamοmili: camomile [Gr: χαμομήλι]
b) hamo: on the ground [Gr: χάμω]
c) milo: apple [Gr: μήλο]
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WKN

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Etymology of wolf

Posted by Johannes on 23 January 2011

Origin of the word wolf .
The word wolf is related to the Latιn lupus (wolf) and the Greek lycos (wolf; Gr: λύκος).

In modern Greek:
a) lycos: wolf [Gr: λύκος]
b) lycophilia: a spurious/sham friendship [lit.: friendship between wolfs (lycos+philia); Gr.: λυκοφιλία]


WKN

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Etymology of can

Posted by Johannes on 11 January 2011

Can – word origin.

The word can (cup, vessel, container) comes from the old english canne (a cup, container) from the Germanic kanna, an early borrowing from late Latin canna (container, vessel), from the Latin canna (reed, reed pipe, small boat), which is related to the Greek canna (reed; Gr.: κάννα).
See also post 158 (Etymology of cane) here.

OED1

OED2

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Etymology of canister

Posted by Johannes on 11 January 2011

Canister – word origin.

Canister (basket, vessel for liquids, container) comes from the Latin canistrum (wicker basket for bread, fruit, flowers, etc.), which is a transliteration of the Greek canistron/canastron (basket made from reed) from canna (reed; Gr: κάννα).

See also post 158 (etymology of cane) here.
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In modern Greek:

a) canistro or canistra: canister [Gr: κάνιστρο or κανίστρα]

 

OED

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Etymology of cannon

Posted by Johannes on 2 January 2011

Origin of the word cannon
The word cannon comes from the old French canon, from the Italian cannone (large tube) from the Latin canna (reed, tube), which is related to the Greek canna (cane, reed; Gr: κάννα).

See also post 158 “Etymology of cane” here.
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In modern Greek:
a) cannoni: cannon [Gr: καννόνι]
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OED

__________________________ Post 159. _____________________________

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