English Words of (Unexpected) Greek Origin.

Learn easily Greek using the roots of the English words.

Posts Tagged ‘Etymologia’

Etymology of cook, cuisine, kitchen

Posted by Johannes on 7 January 2013

The word cook (n) comes from the Latin cocus (cook) from the verb coquo[to cook, to think, to be unquiet, to worry (about), to mix], which most probably derives from the Greek verb cycao/cucao [stir up, mix together; Gr:κυκάω].
Others etymologize coquo from the Greek verb pesso [to cook, to boil, to make something soft (Gr.: πέσσω); Att.: petto (πέττω); later pepto (πέπτω), peptic].
Finally, a few etymologize coquo from the Greek verb ceo (burn; Gr: καίω).

From the same root: 
En: cooker, cookery, cuisine, biscuit, kitchen
Ger: kochen, kuche
It: cuocere, cucina, biscotto
Fr: cuire, cuisine, biscuit

In modern Greek:
a) cyceon: mix of dissimilar things, confusion, disorder [κυκεών]
b) cusina: cuisine, kitchen [κουζίνα; reborrowing]
c) biscoto: biscuit [μπισκότο; reborrowing]

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Etymology of plus, plural

Posted by Johannes on 1 January 2013

The word plus comes from the Latin plus (more) from the Greek pleos [more, in greater number, more than; Gr.: πλέος].

From the same root: 
plural, pluri- pluralism, plurarity, pluralize, pluralist, pleo- (pleomorphic etc), poly-, plethora


In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca)

a) pleon: more [Gr: πλέον]

b) pleonasma: surplus, excess [Gr: πλεόνασμα]

c) pleonasmos: pleonasm [Gr: πλεονασμός ]

d) pleonektima: advantage [Gr: πλεονέκτημα]

e) plethos: a lot of, a large number of [Gr: πλήθος]

f) plethintikos: plural [Gr: πληθυντικός]

g) plethismos: population [Gr: πληθυσμός]

h) plethora: plethora, plenty [Gr: πληθώρα]

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Etymology of elixir

Posted by Johannes on 24 June 2012

The word elixir or philosopher’s stone, believed by alchemists to transmute baser metals into gold and/or to cure diseases and prolong life, comes from the Arabic al-iksir, from the late Greek xirion [powder for drying wounds; Gr: ξηρίον], from the Greek xiros [dry; Gr: ξηρός].
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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) xiros: dry [Gr: ξηρός]
b) xirasia: drought [Gr: ξηρασία]
c) xira: land, mainland [Gr: ξηρά]
d) xirotita: dryness, aridity [Gr: ξηρότητα]
e) elixirio: elixir [Gr: ελιξήριο; loanword]

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Etymology of dragon, dragoon

Posted by Johannes on 2 June 2012

The word dragon comes from the Old French dragon, which in turn comes from the Latin draconem  [huge serpent, dragon], from the Greek word drakon [serpent, giant seafish; Gr: δράκων].
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From the same root: dragoon, dragonet
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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) drakos: dragon [Gr: δράκος]

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Etymology of graffiti

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The wοrd graffiti comes from the Italian graffiti, plural of graffito (a scribbling), from graffiare (to scribble) from the Greek grafein (to write, to draw, to scratch; Gr: γράφειν].
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From the same root: -graphy (eg. geography), graphologist, graphic, praphics, graphite .
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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) grafo: (to write, to draw, to scratch, to type; Gr: γράφω].
b) grapsimo: handwriting [Gr: γράψιμο]
c) graphologos: graphologist [Gr: γραφολόγος]
d) engrafo: document, deed [Gr: έγγραφο]
e) graphica: graphics [Gr: γραφικά]
f) graphites: graphite [Gr: γραφίτης]

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Etymology of gas

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The word gas is simply a phonetic transcription of the Greek word chaos [Gr: χάος]. It was first used in the early 17th century by the chemist J.B. Van Helmont.
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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) haos: chaos [Gr: χάος].
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Etymology of aria

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The word aria comes from the Italian aria, from the Latin aerem, accusative of aer (air), which is a transliteration of the Greek aer [air; Gr: αήρ]. See also etymolology of air here.
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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) Aria: aria [Gr: άρια]

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Etymology of carrot

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The word carrot comes from the old French carrotte, from the Latin carota, which is a transliteration of the Greek caroton (carrot; Gr: καρωτόν).

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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):

a) caroto: carrot [Gr: καρώτο]

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From the same root: carotene, carotenoids

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Etymology of super and over

Posted by Johannes on 10 December 2011

Both super and over come from the Latin super, which merely is a transliteration of the Greek yper/hyper [over, super; Gr: υπέρ].

In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) yper: super, over, hyper- [Gr: υπέρ]
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Etymology of triumph

Posted by Johannes on 10 December 2011

Triumph comes from the old French triumphe from the Latin triumphus (achievement, a success, procession for a victorious general or admiral), which merely is a transliteration of the Greek thriambos.

In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) thriamvos: triumph [Gr: θρίαμβος]
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