English Words of (Unexpected) Greek Origin.

Learn easily Greek using the roots of the English words.

Archive for August, 2008

DENSE, DENSITY

Posted by Johannes on 10 August 2008

Etymology of dense

The adj dense derives from the Latin densus (dense), which derives from the Greek adj δασύς (dasys; dense).
_
From the same root: density
_
In modern Greek.
α) δασύς: dense, thick [dasys]
β) δασύτητα: density, denseness [dasytita]
_
Το επίθετο dense (πυκνός) προέρχεται από το Λατινικό densus (dense), το οποίο με τη σειρά του προέκυψε από το Ελληνικό δασύς.
_
δασύς (dasys) –> dasus –> desus –> densus
_
Post 45.
_

_

Posted in D | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

SOUND

Posted by Johannes on 10 August 2008

Etymology of sound

The word sound came from the Latin sonus, which derives from the Greek τόνος (tonos; tone).
_
From the same root: sonic
_
Η λέξη sound (ήχος, θόρυβος, φωνή) προήλθε από το Λατινικό sonus, το οποίο προέρχεται από το Ελληνικό τόνος.
_
Τόνος (tonos) –> tonus –> sonus –> sound
_
Post 44.


_

Posted in S | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

LIGHT, LUCIDITY, LUCERN

Posted by Johannes on 7 August 2008

Etymology of light, lucidity and lucern

_


The word light derices from the Latin lux (light; gen. lucis), which derives from the Greek word λύκη (lyci; light, the dawn)
_
From the same root: lucidity, lucid, lucern, lucifer
_
In modern Greek.
α) λυκόφως: light of the dawn [lycofos]
β) λυκαυγές: shining of the dawn [lycavges]
γ) λύχνος: lucern [lychnos]
_
_
Η λέξη light προέρχεται από το Λατινικό lux (φως, γεν. lucis), το οποίο προέρχεται από την ελληνική λέξη λύκη (αυγή, φως).
_
λύκη (lyci) –> lux (lucis) –> light
_
Post 43.
_


_

 

Posted in L | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

KEY

Posted by Johannes on 7 August 2008

Etymology of key:

the word key derives from the Latin clavis (key), which in turn derives from the Greek word κλαίς (clais; key), Doric form of κλείς (clis; key). In French clef (key).

_
From the same root: keyboard, keyhole, keystone.
_
In modern Greek
α) κλειδί: key [clidi]
β) κλειδαριά: lock, safety lock [clidaria]
γ) κλειδαράς: locksmith [clidaras]
δ) κλειδώνω: lock (in/out/away) [clidono]
ε) κλείδωμα: lock(ing) [clidoma]
_
Ετυμολογία του key: η λέξη key προέρχεται από το Λατινικό clavis (κλειδί), το οποίο με τη σειρά του προέρχεται από το ελληνικό κλαίς (κλειδί), δωρική μορφή του κλείς (κλειδί).
_
κλαίς (clais) –> claVis –> clef –> key
_
Post 42.
_

_

Posted in K | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

VOMIT

Posted by Johannes on 5 August 2008

The word vomit came from the Latin vomitare from vomo (I vomit), which derives from the greek verb εμέω – εμώ (emo; I vomit).

.

In modern Greek
α) εξεμώ or κάνω εμετό: to vomit [exemo or kano emeto]
β) εμετός: vomit [emetos]
.
Η λέξη vomit (εμετός, κάνω εμετό) προέρχεται από το λατινικό vomo (κάνω εμετώ), το οποίο με τη σειρά του προέρχεται από το ρήμα εμέω – εμώ.
.
εμώ (emo) –> Vemo –> vomo –> vomit
.
Post 38.
.

_

.

Posted in V | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

RICE

Posted by Johannes on 5 August 2008

Etymology of rice

Rice derives from the Italian riso, from the Latin oriza, which is a transliteration of the Greek oryza (rice).

In modern Greek.
α) ρύζι: rice [rizi]

 

Η λέξη rice (ρύζι) προέρχεται από το λατινικό oriza, το οποίο αποτελεί μεταγραφή του ελληνικού όρυζα.
_
όρυζα (oryza) –> oriza –> riso –> rice
_
Post 36.
_

_

Posted in R | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

SCRIPT, SUBSCRIBE, SRIPTURE.

Posted by Johannes on 5 August 2008

Etymology of script, subscribe and Scripture

The noun SCRIPT (something written) comes from the Latin scriptum (a writing, a book, a mark) from the verb scribo (to write), which derives from the Greek verb σκαριφώ (σκραιφώ) (scarifo – screfo; make a scratch, trace or mark with a pencil, write).

 

From the same root: subscribe, subscriber, subscription, Scripture.

 

In modern Greek:
α) σκαρίφημα: sketch, rough drawing [scarifima]
β) σκαριφώ: sketch, draw roughly [scarifo]

 

Το ουσιαστικό SCRIPT (κείμενο, γραφή) προέρχεται από το λατινικό scriptum (κείμενο, βιβλίο) από το ρήμα scribo (γράφω), το οποίο προέρχεται από το ελληνικό ρήμα σκαριφώ (σκραιφώ).

 

σκαριφώ (σκραιφώ; screfo)–> scribo –> scriptum –> script

 

Post 34.

 

_

In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

Posted in S | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

BISHOP

Posted by Johannes on 5 August 2008

Etymology of Bishop
The word BISHOP derives from the Latin episcopus (bishop; contraction of both the beginning and the end of the word), which is a transliteration of the Greek επίσκοπος (episcopos; watcher, overseer), from επί- (epi-; over) + σκοπός (scopos; watcher) from the verb σκοπέω (scopeo; observe, see).

 

In modern Greek
α) Επίσκοπος: bishop [episcopos]
β) επισκόπηση: inspection, review [episcopisi]
γ) επισκοπή: bishopric [episcopi]
δ) επισκοπώ: review, inspect [episcopo]
ε) σκοπός: aim, goal, object, scope, watcher, guard [scopos]
στ) σκοπιά: observation/look-out post, watch-tower [scopia]
_
Η λέξη BISHOP (επίσκοπος) προέρχεται από το λατινικό αντίστοιχο episcopus, το οποίο αποτελεί μεταγραφή του ελληνικού επίσκοπος.

 

επί- (epi-) + σκοπός (scopos) -> επίσκοπος (episcopos) -> episcopus -> bishop

 

Post 33.
_

_

In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

Posted in B | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

MORTAL, MORTALITY, MORTUARY, MURDER

Posted by Johannes on 5 August 2008

Etymology of mortal, mortality, mortuary and murder

The adj MORTAL (deadly, doomed to die) derives from the Latin mortalis (subject to death) from mors (death, gen. mortis), which is a transliteration of the Greek μόρος (moros; death) from the verb μείρω (miro; separate, split, divide; as the dead is separated from all the others).

_
From the same root: mortality, immortality, murder, mortuary
_
In modern Greek
α) μοίρα: fate, destiny, portion, degree [mira]
β) μοιράζω: divide, share (out/in) [mirazo]
γ) μοιραίο: fate, doom, death, fatality [mireo]
δ) μοιραίος: fatal, mortal [mireos]
_
Η λέξη MORTAL (θνητός, θανάσιμος) προέρχεται από το λατινικό αντίστοιχο mortalis από το ουσιαστικό mors (θάνατος, γεν. mortis), το οποίο αποτελεί μεταγραφή του ελληνικού μόρος (θάνατος), από το ρήμα μείρω (μοιράζω, χωρίζω, διαιρώ. Μεμερισμένος τοις πάσιν).
_
μείρω (miro) -> μόρος (moros) -> mors (gen. mortis) -> mortalis -> mortal
_
Post 32.

_


_

In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

Posted in M | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

STOP

Posted by Johannes on 5 August 2008

Etymology of stop

 

The ancient Greek word for oakum, tow was styppe (in modern Greek it is stupee). From that word the Latin noun stuppa (coarse part of flax, tow) was created along with the verb stuppare (to stop or stuff with tow or oakum, to prevent a flow by blocking a hole). The verb was adopted by many languages (It. stoppare, Fr. etouper, Ger. stopfen) and in English stop.
From the same root: stopper, stopgap, stoppage, stopping, stopple etc.

Το στουπί στα αρχαία ελληνικά λεγόταν στυππείον ή στυππή. Από κει προήλθε το Λατινικό stuppa και το ρήμα stuppare (σταματώ, πωματίζω με στουπί, αναστέλλω τη ροή μπλοκάρωντας το άνοιγμα). Το ρήμα υιοθετήθηκε από πολλές γλώσσες (Ιταλικά stoppare, Γαλλικά etouper, Γερμανικά stopfen) και στα Αγγλικά stop.

 

styppe –> stuppa –> stoppare –> stop

Post: 13

In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

Posted in S | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »