English Words of (Unexpected) Greek Origin.

Learn easily Greek using the roots of the English words.

Archive for February, 2009

Etymology of experience, expert, experiment

Posted by Johannes on 22 February 2009

Etymology of experience
Experience comes from the Latin experientia from the verb experior from perior (try, attempt), which derives from the Greek verb peirao (try, attempt, test, get experience; πειράω).
See also Post 76 (Etymology of Pirate)
_
From the same root.
Expert, expertise, expertness, experiment, experienced, experientalism, experimentalize etc.
_
In modern Greek
a) pira: experience, practice [πείρα]
b) pirama: experiment [πείραμα]
c) empiria: experience, practice [εμπειρία]
d) empiricos: empiric [εμπειρικός]
e) empiros: experienced, expert [έμπειρος]
_
Η λέξη experience προέρχεται απο το Λατινικό experientia από το ρήμα experior (προσπαθώ, δοκιμάζω, αποκτώ εμπειρία), το οποίο προέρχεται από το ελληνικό ρήμα πειράω.
_

In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

Advertisements

Posted in E | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Etymology of empirical

Posted by Johannes on 22 February 2009

Etymology of empirical.
Empirical
derives from the Latin empiricus, which is a transliteration of the Greek empiricos (empirical, experienced; εμπειρικός) from empiria (experience; εμπειρία) from en- (in, with) + pira (experience, trial; πείρα), from the verb pirao (make an attempt, try, test, get experience, endeavour, attack; πειράω).
See also post 76.

From the same root
empiricism, empiricist, experience, experiment, expert, piral, piracy

In modern Greek
a) pira: experience, practice [πείρα]
b) pirama:
experiment [πείραμα]
c) empiria: experience, practice [εμπειρία]
d) empiricos:
empiric [εμπειρικός]

Η λέξη empirical (εμπειρικός) προέρχεται από το Λατινικό empiricus, το οποίο αποτελεί μεταγραφή του Ελληνικού εμπειρικός από το ρήμα πειρἀω.

Post 77.


In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

Posted in E | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Etymology of pirate

Posted by Johannes on 18 February 2009

Etymology of pirate

Pirate derives from the Latin pirata (-ae; pirate), which is a transliteration of the Greek piratis (pirate; πειρατής) from the verb pirao (make an attempt, try, test, get experience, endeavour, attack; πειράω).

_

From the same root:
piracy, piratical, experience, expert, empiric.

_

In modern Greek

.

a) piratis: pirate [πειρατής]

.

b) piratia: piracy [πειρατία]

.

c) pira: experience, practice [πείρα]

.

d) pirama: experiment [πείραμα]
.
e) empiria: experience, practice [εμπειρία]

.

f) empiricos: empiric [εμπειρικός]
.
g) piragma: teasing [πείραγμα]

.

h) pirazo: tease, give trouble [πειράζω]

_

Η λέξη pirate (πειρατής) προέρχεται απο το Λατινικός pirata (-ae), το ,οποίο αποτελεί μεταγραφή του Ελληνικού πειρατής από το ρήμα πειράω (αποπειρούμαι, δοκιμάζω, επιχειρώ).

_

Post 76

_

pirao –> piratis –> pirata –> pirate

_

 

In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

Posted in P | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Etymology of ferocity – ferocious

Posted by Johannes on 18 February 2009

Etymology of ferocity
Ferocity
derives from the Latin ferocis, from fera/ferus (wild, savage), which is a transliteration of the Greek Aeolic form feros (φηρός) of theros (gen. of ther; wild animal, beast; θήρ)
_

From the same root:
ferocious, ferociously, ferociousness, fierce, fierceness, fiercely

_

In modern Greek

a) therio: wild beast [θηρίο]

b) theriodes: ferocious, savage [θηριώδης]

c) theriodia: ferocity, fierceness, atrocity [θηριωδία]

d) therama: prey [θήραμα]

Η λέξη ferocity (θηριωδία, αγριότητα) προέρχεται από το Λατινικό ferocis, από το fera/ferus (άγριος, θηριώδης), το οποίο αποτελεί μεταγραφή της Αιολικής μορφής φηρός του θηρός (γεν. του θήρ -θηρίο-)

Post 75.

 

In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

Posted in F | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Etymology of Throne

Posted by Johannes on 1 February 2009

Etymology of throne
Throne derives from the Latin thronus, which is a transliteration of the Greek thronos (throne, chair, elevated seat; θρόνος) from the attic thranos (elevated seat, chair, lit. the seats of the upper line of oarsmen in the ancient ships called triremes. The oars in that line were bigger and longer and the duty of these oarsmen was more heavy; θράνος)
.
.
From the same root:
enthrone
.
.
In modern Greek
a) thronos: thone [θρόνος]
b) enthronizo: enthrone [ενθρονίζω]
c) thranio: desk, form [θρανίο]
.
.
Η λέξη Throne προέρχεται από Λατινικό thronus, το οποίο αποτελεί μεταγραφή του Ελληνικού θρόνος από το Αττικό θράνος (κάθισμα, εδρα, κυριολεκτικώς η άνω σειρά των κωπών τριήρους)

.

.

thranos (θράνος) –> thronos (θρόνος) –> thronus –> throne
Post 74.

 

In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

Posted in T | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Etymology of incline, recline and decline

Posted by Johannes on 1 February 2009

Etymology of incline, recline and decline
All three verbs have the same root -cline combined with the prefixes in-, re- and de-, respectively. The root derives from the Latin verb clino, which is a transliteration of the Greek verb clino (to slope, incline, bend; κλίνω).

 

See also “Etymology of climate” (Post 70)

From the same root:
inclination, declension, declination, declinable, declivitous, declivity, climax, clinic, lean

In modern Greek
1. clino : incline, slope, decline (grammar) [κλίνω]

2. clisi: inclination bent, slope gradient, declension [κλίση ]

3. climax or climaka: scale, ladder [ κλίμαξ or κλίμακα]

4. apoclisi: declination, devergency, deviation [απόκλιση ]

5. cliticos: adj inflected [κλιτικός ]

6. clini: bed [κλίνη]

7. clinici: clinic [κλινική]

8. clima: climate [κλίμα ]

 

Τα ρήματα incline (κλίνω, σκύβω, τείνω, ρέπω), recline (ανακλίνομαι, πλαγιάζω) και decline (κλίνω, γέρνω, κατηφορίζω, φθίνω, παρακμάζω, δύω) έχουν στη ρίζα τους το Λατινικό ρήμα clino, το οποίο είναι μεταγραφή του Ελληνικού κλίνω

 

Post 73

In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

Posted in D, Ι, R | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Etymology of lean

Posted by Johannes on 1 February 2009

Etymology of lean

The verb lean derives from the inf. klinein (κλίνειν) of the Greek verb klino (to slope, incline, bend; κλίνω). The verb klino was transliterated as clino in Latin.
_
See also “Etymology of climate” (Post 70)
_

From the same root
enclitic, recline, decline etc (clinare, reclinare, declinare, inclinare etc. )

In modern Greek
a) clino: to slope, incline, bend [κλίνω]
b) encliticos: enclitic [εγκλιτικός]

Το ρήμα lean (κλίνω, γέρνω, στηρίζομαι, ακουμπώ) προέρχεται από το ρήμα κλίνω (απαρ. κλίνειν).

Post 72.

 

In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

Posted in L | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »