English Words of (Unexpected) Greek Origin.

Learn easily Greek using the roots of the English words.

Archive for December, 2009

Etymology of fracture, fragile, fragment, fraction, break.

Posted by Johannes on 27 December 2009

Origin of fracture, fragile, fragment, fraction, break.
The word fracture (a breaking of a bone) comes from the latin verb frango/frangere (break), which derives from the Greek verb rig-nimi (break; ρήγ-νυμι) and its root frag- (Fραγ-).

From the same root.
fracture, fragile, fragment, fraction, break, fractional, fractionate, fractionize, fractious, fragility, fragmental, fragmentation
.

In modern Greek (Romeika, the language of Romei/Romans/Ρωμηοί)
a) ragada: crack, crevice [ραγάδα]
b) ragizo: break, crack [ραγίζω]
c) rogmi:
break, crack, fissure [ρωγμή]
d) aragis (a+rag): unbreakable [αρραγής]
e) rakos:
rag, tatter [ράκος]
f) rixi:
rupture [ρήξη]
_
Η λέξη fracture (σπάσιμο, κάταγμα) προέρχεται από το λατινικό ρήμα frango/frangere (σπάω, ρήγνυμι), το οποίο με τη σειρά του προέρχεται από το ελληνικό ρήγνυμι και τη ρίζα του Fραγ-.

Post 126.
_______

_________________________________________________________________
In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

Advertisements

Posted in B, F | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Etymology of glamour

Posted by Johannes on 27 December 2009

Origin of glamour
The word glamour (magic charm, alluring beauty or charm, a spell affecting the eye, a kind of haze in the air) comes from the Scottish term gramarye (magic, enchantment, spell), an alteration of the English word grammar (any sort of scholarship) from the latin grammatica, which is a transliteration of the Greek word grammatice (grammar; γραμματική).

Note: Others etymologize the Scottish gramarye from the Greek grammarion (gram; weight unit; γραμμάριο).

From the same root.
glamorize, glamorous, grammar, grammatical, grammatic

In modern Greek (Romeika, the language of Romei/Romans/Ρωμηοί)
a) gramma:
letter [γράμμα]
b) grammateas: secretary [γραμματέας]
c) grammatia:
secretariat [γραμματεία]
d) grammatici: grammar [γραμματική]
e) grammaticos:
grammatical [γραμματικός]
f) grammatio: note, bill, bond [γραμμάτιο]
g) grammatocivotio: letter-box [γραμματοκιβώτιο]
h) grammatosimo: stamp [γραμματόσημο]

Η λέξη glamour (γοητεία, θέλγητρο, σαγήνη, γόητρο, λάμψη) προέρχεται από το λατινικό grammatica, το οποίο αποτελεί μεταγραφή του ελληνικού γραμματική.

Post 125.
____________________________________________________

In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

Posted in G | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Etymology of retro

Posted by Johannes on 27 December 2009

Origin of retro.
The word retro (behind, back) comes from the Latin retro, which, most probably, is derived from the Greek verb eretyo (retyo) (to keep back, suspend; ερητύω).

From the same root:
retro-, re-

 

Η λέξη retro (πίσω) προέρχεται από το Λατινικό retro, το οποίο πιθανότατα προέρχεται από το Ελληνικό ρήμα ερητύω (κρατώ πίσω, αναστέλλω, αναχαιτίζω, κρατώ οπίσω από τινος, απομακρύνω απο τι).

Post 124.

_______________________________________________

In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

Posted in R | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Etymology of Aretha

Posted by Johannes on 27 December 2009

Origin of Aretha
The female proper name Aretha derives from the Greek name Arete (Αρετή) meaning “virtue, excellence”.

In modern Greek (Romeika, the language of Romei/Romans/Ρωμηοί)
a) arete and Arete (as a female proper name): virtue [Αρετή]

Το όνομα Aretha προέρχεται από το Ελληνικό όνομα Αρετή.

Post 123.
________________________________________________
In wordpress: https://ewonago.wordpress.com/

Posted in A | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Etymology of Ambrose

Posted by Johannes on 27 December 2009

Origin of Ambrose
The masculine proper noun Ambrose comes from the Late Latin name Ambrosius (e.g. Saint Ambrosius – 4th century), which is a transliteration of the Greek name Ambrosios (Αμβρόσιος) meaning “immortal” (A+brotos).

From the same root:
Ambrosine, ambrosia, ambrosian

In modern Greek (Romeika, the language of Romei/Romans/Ρωμηοί)
a) ambrosia or better amvrosia: ambrosia [αμβροσία]
b) Ambrosios (Amvrosios): Ambrose [Αμβρόσιος]

Το όνομα Ambrose προέρχεται από το Ελληνικό Αμβρόσιος (αθάνατος, α + βροτός).

Post 122.

In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

Posted in A | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »