English Words of (Unexpected) Greek Origin.

Learn easily Greek using the roots of the English words.

Archive for the ‘A’ Category

Etymology of antelope

Posted by Johannes on 11 August 2013

The word antelope comes from the Old French antelop, from Medieval Latin ant(h)alopus (11c.), from Greek antholops (attested in Eusebius of Antioch, c.336 C.E.), a fabulous animal haunting the banks of the Euphrates, very savage, hard to catch and having long saw-like horns capable of cutting down trees.

In modern Greek:
a) antilopi: antelope [Gr: αντιλόπη]

 

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Etymology of aria

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The word aria comes from the Italian aria, from the Latin aerem, accusative of aer (air), which is a transliteration of the Greek aer [air; Gr: αήρ]. See also etymolology of air here.
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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) Aria: aria [Gr: άρια]

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Etymology of anthem

Posted by Johannes on 9 July 2011

Origin of the word anthem
The word anthem comes from the old English ontemn, antefn, “a composition (in prose or verse) sung antiphonally,” from the Latin antefana, a transliteration of the Greek antiphona “verse response”.

From the same root:
antiphon, phonetic etc

In modern Greek (Romeika)
a) antiphono: antiphon [Gr: αντίφωνο]
b) anti-: anti-[Gr: αντι-]
c) anti: instead of, in place of, as, for [Gr: αντί]
d) phone or better phoni: voice [Gr: φωνή]
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Etymology of April

Posted by Johannes on 9 July 2011

Origin of the word April

The word April comes from the old French Avril, from the Latin Aprilis (month of Venus, the second month of the ancient Roman calendar, dedicated to the goddess Venus) from Apru, a transliteration of the Greek Aphro from Aphrodite (Venus; Gr: Αφροδίτη).

In modern Greek (Romeika)
a) Aprilis: April [Gr: Απρίλης]

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Post 184.

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/April#Etymology

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Etymology of almanac

Posted by Johannes on 26 June 2011

Origin of the word almanac
The word almanac comes from the old French almanach from the Spanish-Arabic al-manakh (calendar, almanac) from the arabic article al- and the Greek meneacon/manacon [of a month, of a lunary circle, calendar of a month; Gr.: μηνιακόν / μηναίον] from the root men/mene [moon, month; Gr.: μήν/μήνη].

In modern Greek (Romeika)
a) almanac: almanac [Gr: αλμανάκ]
b) menas: month [Gr: μήνας]
c) menieos: monthly, of the month [Gr: μηνιαίος]
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Etymology of albatross

Posted by Johannes on 25 May 2011

Origin of the word albatross.
The word albatross comes from the Portuguese alcatraz (pelican) from the Arabic al-câdous or al-ġaţţās (a pelican), from the Greek word kados [jar; Gr: κάδος ] in reference to the pelican’s pouch. The spelling was influenced by the Latin albus (white).


In modern Greek (Romeika)
a) kados: jar [Gr: κάδος]
b) albatros: albatross [Gr: άλμπατρος; loanword].

Post 182.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=albatros&searchmode=none

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Etymology of anchovy

Posted by Johannes on 23 May 2011

Origin of the word anchovy.
The word anchovy comes from the Genoese anchova, from the Latin apua (small fish) from the Greek aphye [small fry; Gr.: αφύη].

In modern Greek (Romeika)
a) anchuyia: anchovy [Gr.: αντσούγια; loanword]
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http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=anchovy&searchmode=none

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Etymology of ampoule (ampul, ampulla)

Posted by Johannes on 14 May 2011

Word origin of ampoule (ampul, ampulla)

The word ampoule (small bottle or flask) comes from the Latin ampulla, a contracted form of amphora, which is a transliteration of the Greek amphorefs/amphora (vessel, flask, bottle; Gr: αμφορεύς)

 

 

 


In modern Greek (
Romeika)

 a) ampula: ampoule [Gr: αμπούλα; loanword]

 b) amphoreas: amphora [Gr: αμφορέας]

 

 

 

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 http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=ampoule&searchmode=none

 

 

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Etymology of austere

Posted by Johannes on 4 March 2011

Origin of the word austere

Austere comes from the Latin austerus (dry, harsh), which is a transliteration of the Greek austeros (bitter, harsh; Gr.: αυστηρός).
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From the same root: austerity
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In modern Greek (Romeika):
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a) afsteros: austere [Gr: αυστηρός]
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b) afsterotita: austerity [Gr.: αυστηρότητα]
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Etymology of aegis

Posted by Johannes on 24 October 2010

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Origin of aegis
The word aegis (protection) derives from the Latin ægis, which is a transliteration of the Greek Aigis, the shield of Zeus, related to aix (gen. aigos) “goat,” as the shield was of goatskin.

Under the aegis of someone: under the auspices of someone, under the sponsorship or protection of someone or some group.
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In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) aegida: aegis [αιγίδα]
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