English Words of (Unexpected) Greek Origin.

Learn easily Greek using the roots of the English words.

Archive for March, 2011

Etymology of saliva

Posted by Johannes on 20 March 2011

Origin of the word saliva.

The word saliva comes from the Latin saliva (spittle), from the Greek sialon (saliva, spittle; Gr: σίαλον).
.
From the same root:
English: salivation, salivary, salivate
French: salive, salivation, salivaire
.

.

In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) salio or sialos or sielos: saliva [Gr: σάλιο or σίαλος or σίελος]
b) sielogonos: salivary [Gr: σιελογόνος]
c) sielorrhea: salivation [Gr: σιελόρροια]
.
Post 175.
.
Advertisements

Posted in S | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Etymology of misery

Posted by Johannes on 20 March 2011

Origin of the word misery
The word misery comes from the French miserie from the Latin miseria (wretchedness) from miser (wretched), which is a transliteration of the Greek miseros/misaros (abominable, despicable, wretched; Gr: μυσαρός) from misos (evrything that cause abhorrence, repulsion, revulsion; Gr: μύσος).
.
.

From the same root:
English: miserable, miser, miserly
French: misere, miserable, miserieux, misericorde, miserere
Italian: miseria, misere, miserabile, misericordia, misserimo
Spanish: miseria, misero, miserable, misericordia, miserere
.
.

In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) mizeria: misery [Gr: μιζέρια; loanword]
b) mizeros: miserable, wretched [Gr: μίζερος]
.

Post: 174.
.

Posted in M | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Etymology of salary

Posted by Johannes on 17 March 2011

Origin of the word salary

Salary derives from the French salarie from the Latin salarium (salary, stipend, originally soldier’s allowance for the purchase of salt) from sal (salt), which comes from the Greek als (salt; Gr: άλς).
.
From the same root: salt, salad, salami
.
In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) alas or alati: salt [Gr: άλας or αλάτι]
b) salata: salad [Gr: σαλάτα]
c) salami: salami [Gr: σαλάμι]

 

Post: 173

 

Posted in S | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Etymology of the name Christ

Posted by Johannes on 6 March 2011

Word origin of the name Christ
Christ comes from the Greek word Christos (Gr: Χριστός), which means “the anointed one”. It was a translation of the Jewish word Messiah.
.

Jesus Christ, Saint Catherine’s Monastery, Mount Sinai.

.
.
From the same root:

Christmas, Christian, Christianity, Christology.
.

In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) Christos: Christ [Gr: Χριστός]
b) Christianos: Christian [Gr: Χριστιανός]
c) Christugenna: Christmas [Gr: Χριστούγεννα; lit. Christ’s birth]
d) Christologia: Christology [Gr: Χριστολογία]
e) Christianismos: Christianity [Gr: Χριστιανισμός]
.
Post 172

Posted in C | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Etymology of austere

Posted by Johannes on 4 March 2011

Origin of the word austere

Austere comes from the Latin austerus (dry, harsh), which is a transliteration of the Greek austeros (bitter, harsh; Gr.: αυστηρός).
.
From the same root: austerity
.
 
In modern Greek (Romeika):
.
a) afsteros: austere [Gr: αυστηρός]
.
b) afsterotita: austerity [Gr.: αυστηρότητα]
.
.
Post 171.
.

Posted in A | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Etymology of pectoral

Posted by Johannes on 4 March 2011

Origin of the word pectoral

The word pectoral (pertaining to the breast), comes from the Latin pectoralis from pectus (breast, chest), fom the Greek pectos (compact, firm; Gr.: πηκτός)

Post 170.

.

Posted in P | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »