English Words of (Unexpected) Greek Origin.

Learn easily Greek using the roots of the English words.

Archive for December, 2011

Etymology of super and over

Posted by Johannes on 10 December 2011

Both super and over come from the Latin super, which merely is a transliteration of the Greek yper/hyper [over, super; Gr: υπέρ].

In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) yper: super, over, hyper- [Gr: υπέρ]
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Etymology of triumph

Posted by Johannes on 10 December 2011

Triumph comes from the old French triumphe from the Latin triumphus (achievement, a success, procession for a victorious general or admiral), which merely is a transliteration of the Greek thriambos.

In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) thriamvos: triumph [Gr: θρίαμβος]
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Etymology of unity, union, unit

Posted by Johannes on 10 December 2011

The word unity comes from the French unite, from Latin unitatem, from unus (one) from the Greek oenos (one). See also “Etymology of one” here.

From the same root: union, unit

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Etymology of unique

Posted by Johannes on 10 December 2011

The word unique (single, solitary) comes from the French unique, from the Latin unicus (single, sole), from unus (one), from the Greek oenos (one). See also “Etymology of one” here.

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Etymology of one

Posted by Johannes on 10 December 2011

The word one comes from the Latin unus, which in turn derives from the Greek oenos [one, ace in dice; Gr: οινός].
Note: Some etymologize unus from the gen. enos of eis [one; Gr: εις].

From the same root: unity, unique.

In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) enas:
one [Gr: ένας]
b) enotita: unity [Gr: ενότητα]
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Etymology of labor

Posted by Johannes on 3 December 2011

The verb labor (perform manual or physical work; work hard, take pains) comes from the French labourer, from the Latin laborate/labor, which most probably derives from the Greek verb lamvano/lavo (to undertake; Gr: λαμβάνω).

Note: Some etymologize labor from the Greek word laepsiros [one who runs very fast, agile, speedy; la+aepsiros; Gr: λαιψηρός, λα+αιψηρός].

From the same root: laboratory, laborious, collaborate, collaboration.

In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca)
a) lamvano: receive, take, get, obtain [Gr: λαμβάνω]
b) analamvano: undertake, resume, retake [Gr: αναλαμβάνω]
c) syllamvano: arrest, catch, take, capture [Gr: συλλαμβάνω]
d) lipsi: receiving, receipt, reception, taking [Gr: λήψη]

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See also: Luke 10:40 “Κύριε, οὐ μέλει σοι ὅτι ἡ ἀδελφή μου μόνην με κατέλιπε διακονεῖν; εἰπὲ οὖν αὐτῇ ἵνα μοι συν-αντι-λάβηται.” , “…Tell her to help me (to work with me, to com-laborate/to collaborate with me)”

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Etymology of latex

Posted by Johannes on 3 December 2011

The word latex (liquid, body fluid) comes from the Latin latex (gen. laticis; liquid, fluid), which derives from the Greek latax (dregs, the remnant of wine flung into a vessel or on the ground; Gr: λάταξ).

In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) latex: latex [loanword; Gr: λάτεξ]
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Etymology of donation

Posted by Johannes on 3 December 2011

The word donation comes from the Old French donacion from the Latin donationem (nom. donatio) from donum/dorum (gift), which derives from the Greek doron [gift; Gr: δώρον].

From the same root: donate, donator, donatory

In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) doro: gift [Gr: δώρο]
b) dorizo: donate, to make a gift [Gr: δωρίζω]
c) doritis: giver, donator [Gr: δωρητής]
d) dorea: donation, gift [Gr: δωρεά]
e) dorean: gratis, free (of charge) [Gr: δωρεάν]
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