ENGLISH WORDS AND GREEK COGNATES.

Learn easily Greek via the linguistic relationships and the roots of the English words.

Etymology of coup

Posted by Johannes on 14 April 2020

Origin of the word “coup”

The word coup comes from the French coup, from Medieval Latin colpus, from Vulgar Latin colapus, from Latin colaphus “a cuff, box on the ear,” from the Greek colaphos (punch, slap; Gr: κόλαφος).


In modern Greek: 

a) colaphos: punch, slap [Gr: κόλαφος]


OED

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Etymology of milk

Posted by Johannes on 14 April 2020

Etymology of milk

The word milk comes from the Proto-Germanic meluk,  which is related to the Greek verb amelgo (to milk, to draw; αμέλγω).

 

From the same root

milk (Eng); Milche (Ger)

 

In modern Greek:

a) armego: to milk [αρμέγω]

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OED

Το αγγλικό MILK (γάλα), όπως και το γερμανικό αντίστοιχο Milche (γάλα) σχετίζονται με το ρήμα αμέλγω (αρμέγω).

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Tags within the post: etymology of milk, origin of milk, etymologia des Milche, learn greek using cognates, learn Greek, etymology of Latin words, origin of Latin words, Origin of English words, etymology of English words, αμέλγω, αρμέγω, προέλευση αγγλικών λέξεων, ελληνική γλώσσα, προέλευση Λατινικών, Λατινικά, Ρωμαίικα, Greek language, english language

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Etymology of cemetery

Posted by Johannes on 14 April 2020

CEMETARY derives from the Latin coemeterium from the Greek coemeterion [κοιμητήριον], which means the cemetery, the burial ground, the graveyard.

In modern Greek:

kemetery: cemetery [κοιμητήρι]

kemame: I sleep [κοιμάμαι]

OED

Η λέξη CEMETARY προέρχεται από την ελληνική λέξη “κοιμητήριον”

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Etymology of macaroni

Posted by Johannes on 14 April 2020

Etymology of macaroni

The word MACARONI derives from the southern Italian dialect word macceroni (pl. of maccarone) from maccare, which is related to the Greek macariaa food made from barley.

In modern Greek

macaroni: macaroni, pasta (μακαρόνι)

OED

Η λέξη MACARONI προέρχεται από τη λέξη της διαλέκτου της νοτίου Ιταλίας macceroni (από το maccare) η οποία σχετίζεται με την ελληνική λέξη μακαρία, που ήταν φαγητό φτιαγμένο από κριθάρι.

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Etymology of video, vision, visit

Posted by Johannes on 11 August 2013

The word video comes from the Latin video (I see), which is related to the Greek verb ideo[to see; Gr: ιδέω, είδον; ε-Fιδ-ον]].

From the same root: vision, visible, visit, idea

In modern Greek:
a) ida: I saw  [Gr: είδα]
b) idea: idea [Gr: ιδέα]
c) video: video (loanword) [Gr: βίντεο]

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Etymology of villa, village, vicinity

Posted by Johannes on 11 August 2013

The word villa comes from the Italian villa (country house, villa), from the Latin villa (country house, farm), from vicus (house, village, group of houses), which is related to the Greek oecos [house; ie. eco-logy; Gr: οίκος].

From the same root: village, vicinity, villain, villainous, villainy, eco- (eco-logy, ecosystem, eco-nomy etc)

In modern Greek:
a) icos:house [Gr: οίκος]
b) icologia: ecology [Gr: οικολογία]
c) icosystima: ecosystem [Gr: οικοσύστημα]
d) iconomia: economy  [Gr: οικονομία]

OED

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Etymology of similar

Posted by Johannes on 11 August 2013

The word similar comes from French similaire, from the Latin similis (like), from Old Latin semol (together), which is related to the Greek omalo(semalos*) [even, same; ομαλός]

From the same root: similarity, same

In modern Greek:
a) omalos: even, plain [Gr: ομαλός]
b) omios: same [Gr: όμοιος ]

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* Kouvelas : Etymological and explanatory dictionary of the Latin language.

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Etymology of gondola

Posted by Johannes on 11 August 2013

The word gondola comes from the Old Italian gondula, from the late Latincondua (gondola) from the late Greek condura (small boat) from the Greek adjective conduros [condos + ura; with short tail].* Others etymologize gondola from the Greek condy [Gr: κονδύ], a kind of glass.*

In modern Greek:
a) gondola: gondola [Gr: γόνδολα]

* Babiniotis Etymological Dictionary of Modern Greek

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Etymology of gamut

Posted by Johannes on 11 August 2013

The word gamut originally “lowest note in the medieval musical scale,” in the system of notation devised by Guido d’Arezzo, contraction of Medieval Latin gamma ut, from gamma, the Greek letter, indicating a note below A, + ut (later do), the low note on the six-note musical scale that took names from corresponding syllables in a Latin hymn for St. John the Baptist’s Day:
Ut queant laxis resonare fibris
Mira gestorum famuli tuorum
Solve polluti labii reatum,
etc. Gamut came to be used for “the whole musical scale;” the figurative sense of “entire scale or range” of anything is first recorded 1620s.

In modern Greek:
a) gamma: the Greek letter gamma [Gr: γάμμα; γ ]
b) gama: gamut, spectrum, range [Gr: γκάμα]

 

OED.

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Etymology of gum

Posted by Johannes on 11 August 2013

The word gum (resin), comes from the Old French gome “(medicinal) gum, resin,” from the Latin cummi, a transliteration of the Greek commi [gum; Gr:κόμμι]. As a shortened form of chewing gum, first attested 1842 in American English.

In modern Greek:
a) gomma: gum, ruber, eraser [Gr: γόμμα]

 

OED 

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