English Words of (Unexpected) Greek Origin.

Learn easily Greek using the roots of the English words.

Archive for September, 2011

Etymology pf physic, physician, physics, physical, physi-

Posted by Johannes on 25 September 2011

The word physic (art of healing, medical science, natural science), comes from the Latin physica (study of nature), from the Greek physike [Gr: φυσική] (knowledge of nature), from physis (nature) [Gr: φύση],” from the verb phyo (to bring forth, produce) [Gr: φύω].
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In modern Greek (Romeika).
a) physi: nature [Gr: φύση]
b) physici: physics [Gr: φυσική]
c) physicos: natural, normal, unaffected [Gr: φυσικός]
d) physiologia: physiology [Gr: φυσιολογία]
e) and many other words that can easily be understood containing the root physi- like: physiotherapeftis (physiotherapist), physicomathematicos, physiognomia, physiognomistis, physiocraticos etc.

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Etymology of brillinat

Posted by Johannes on 11 September 2011

Brilliant comes from the French brilliant (sparkling, shining) from the Italian brillare (sparkle, whirl), from the Latin berillare (to shine like a beryl), from berillus (beryl, precious stone), from the Latin beryllus, which is a transliteration of the Greek beryllos [beryl, precious stone; Gr: βήρυλλος].
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In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) beryllos (or better pronounced as viryllos): beryl [Gr: βήρυλλος]
b) beryllio: beryllium (Be) [Gr: βηρύλλιο]
c) brilanti (or brigianti): diampond, brilliant [Gr: μπριλάντι]
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Fr: briller, brillantine, brillant; It: brillare; Grm: Brillant, Brille
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Etymology of mariner, marine

Posted by Johannes on 11 September 2011

Mariner comes from the old French marinier, from the Latin marinus (fem. marina) [of the sea], from mare (gen. maris) [sea], which, most likely, comes from the Greek stem-word myra (sea), from myro [flow, drip; Gr: μύρω]. See also post 193 “etymology of myriad” here.
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In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) plemyra:
over-flow, flood [Gr: πλημμύρα] (pleion+myra);
b) almyra: saltiness, lt. salt of the sea (als+myra); [Gr: αλμύρα]
c) almyrici: small tree near the sea (genus Tamarix, salt cedar); [Gr: αλμυρίκι]
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Etymology of myriad

Posted by Johannes on 11 September 2011

The word myriad comes from the old French myriade, from the Latin myrias (gen. myriadis) “ten thousand,” which id a transliteration of the Greek myrias (gen. myriados) [ten thousand; Gr: μυριάς]. The word myrias derives from myra (sea; Lat: mare).
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In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) myriada: myriad [Gr: μυριάδα]
b) myro: scent, perfume, aromatic oil, myrrh [Gr: μύρο]
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Fr: myriade; It: miriade; Sp: miriada; Grm: Myriade
From myrias also deriaves the Latin word mile/mille (thousand).
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From the root-word myra (sea) derive many modern Greek words like: plemyra [over-flow, flood; Gr: πλημμύρα; (pleion+myra], almyra [saltiness, lt. salt of the sea (als+myra); Gr: αλμύρα] and one source even etymologizes the name Myriam from myra (Lady of the sea).
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