English Words of (Unexpected) Greek Origin.

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Archive for March, 2010

Etymology of mill

Posted by Johannes on 28 March 2010

Origin of mill
The word mill comes from the Latin mola (mill, millstone), which is a transliteration of the Greek myle (mill, millstone; μύλη).
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From the same root
English:
millstone, miller
French: meule, molette, meunier
Italian: mola, mugnaio
Spanish: muela, moleta, molinero
German: Muhlstein, Muller
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In Romeika (modern Greek, the language of Romei/Romans/Ρωμηοί)
a) milos:
mill [μύλος]
b) milopetra:
millstone [milo (mill)+ petra (stone); μυλόπετρα]
c) milonas: miller [μυλωνάς]
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Η λέξη mill (μύλος) προέρχεται από το Λατινικό mola (μύλος), το οποίο αποτελεί μεταγραφή του Ελληνικού μύλη.
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meule (μύλος), molette (τροχίσκος), meunier (μυλωνάς)
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Post 138.
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tags within the post: etymology of mill, etymology of millstone, etymology of miller, etymologia de mola, etymologia de mugnaio, etymologie de meule, etymologie de molette, etymologie de meunier, προέλευση αγγλικών λέξεων, Ελληνική γλώσσα, etymologia, etymologie, learn Greek online, learn easily Greek using cognates, learn Greek for free, etymology, etymologie, etymologia, origin of Latin words, etymology of English, loan words in English, origin of English, origin of English words, English words from Greek, Latin words from Greek, Greek language, ετυμολογία, ετυμολογία Λατινικών, ετυμολογία αγγλικών λέξεων, προέλευση αγγλικών λέξεων, προέλευση Λατινικών, ελληνικές λέξεις στα Αγγλικά, αντιδάνεια, French words from Greek, English words from Greek, Spanish words from Greek, German words from Greek, Italian words from Greek, loanwords, etymology of French words, etymology of English words, etymology of Spanish words, etymology of German words, etymology of Italian words, cognates, learn Greek fast, learn modern Greek,origin of mill, origin of millstone, origin of miller, origine de mola, origine de mugnaio, origine de meule, origine de molette, origine de meunier, origin of Latin, origin of English words, learn Greek.

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Etymology of milk

Posted by Johannes on 28 March 2010

Origin of milk

The word milk comes from the Latin verb mulgeo (to milk), which is a transliteration of the the Greek verb amelgo (to milk, to draw; αμέλγω).

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From the same root:
milk (Eng) & Milche (Ger)

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In Romeika (modern Greek, the language of Romei/Romans/Ρωμηοί):
a) armego: to milk [αρμέγω]
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Το αγγλικό MILK (γάλα), όπως και το γερμανικό αντίστοιχο Milche (γάλα) προέρχεται από το ρήμα αμέλγω, δηλαδή αρμέγω.

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Tags within the post: etymology of milk, origin of milk, etymologia des Milche, learn greek using cognates, learn Greek, etymology of Latin words, origin of Latin words, Origin of English words, etymology of English words, αμέλγω, αρμέγω, προέλευση αγγλικών λέξεων, αγγλικές λέξεις από την ελληνική, ελληνική γλώσσα, δάνεια στην αγγλική, προέλευση Λατινικών, Λατινικά, Ρωμαίικα, Greek language, english language

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Etymology of devil

Posted by Johannes on 28 March 2010

Origin of devil

The word devil comes from the Latin diabolus (devil), which is a transliteration of the Greek diabolos (devil; diavolos; διάβολος) from the verb diaballo (to insinuate things (against sb), put sb in a bad light, slander, calumniate; from dia- “across, through” + ballo “to throw”; diavallo; διαβάλλω).
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From the same root
English: diabolic, diablerie, ballistic
French: diable, diabolique, diablerie
Italian: diavolo, dabolico, diavoleria
Spanish: diablo, dabolico, diablura
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In Romeika (modern Greek, the language of Romei/Romans/Ρωμηοί)
a) diavolos: devil [διάβολος]
b) diavallo: to insinuate things (against sb), put sb in a bad light, slander, calumniate [διαβάλλω]
c) diavoli: calumny, false accusation [διαβολή]
d) diavolicos: diabolic [διαβολικός]
e) vallo: attack, hit out [βάλλω]
f) vallisticos: ballistic [βαλλιστικός]
g) voli: throw, shot [βολή]
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Η λέξη devil προέρχεται από το ελληνικό διάβολος.

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Post 137.

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tags within the post: etymology of devil, etymology of diabolic, etymology of diablerie, etymology of ballistic, origin of devil, origin of diabolic, origin of diablerie, origin of ballistic, learn Greek, etymologia de diavolo, etymologie de diable, ετυμολογία, προέλευση αγγλικών λέξεων, προέλευση λατινικών, ετυμολογία του διαβόλου, μαθαίνω ελληνι΄κά, learn Greek online, learn easily Greek, learn Greek for free, etymologia, ετυμολογία

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The term Romei (Romans – Ρωμηοί). Short historical synopsis.

Posted by Johannes on 22 March 2010

The term Romei (Romans – Ρωμηοί).

Short historical synopsis:

The term Romei (Romans, plural of Romeos/Roman) reffers to all inhabitans of the Roman Empire (or Romania, as it was called by the citizens; Ρωμανία).

The main characteristic of this state (especially after Constantine the Great) was that the people were Orthodox Christians. The Roman Orthodoxs, the citizens of the Empire, spoke either Greek (all over the Empire and especially in the areas of modern Greece, Balkans, Turkey, Syria, Palestine, Egypt and Italy) or Latin/Latinized dialects (areas of modern France, Spain, North Italy, Roumania-Wallachia/Vlachia, Albania etc.). Nevertheless, the Greek language was spoken by the great majority of the population. Remember that the Bible was written in Greek. Even the Paul’s Epistle to the Romans (52-55 AD) was written in Greek!!! That means that the majority of the people even in the city of Rome itself spoke Greek. In any case, the Latin-language was related and akin to the Greek-language. Some even characterize it as an Aeolic Greek dialect. Moreover, many citizens of the Empire were bilingual, speaking both Greek and Latin. Even today in Greece there are thousands of Vlachs, who speak a Latin dialect. The language was never a problem. All the citizens were Romei/Romans, all of them were brothers belonging to the same state, the Romania.

Franks and other illiterate German tribes enslaved western Romei and led them to more than a thousand years of total darkness. They (less than 10% of total polulation) ruled the enslaved Romei with the force of arms, feudalism, ignorance and via the church that was totally controlled by Frank Popes. In order to make the enslaved Romans neglect and forget the brotherhood with the free Romans, the Frank rulers (especially after Charlemagne) started call the free Romans as Greeks and heretics and inspired hatred against them, against the enslaved Roman’s real brothers, against their compatriots.

In 1453 AD the Turks [keep in mind that the majority of the Turks are not Mongols but Romei forcedly converted to islam] conquered Romania. After 4 centuries of slavery, in 1821 AD, the Romans revolted against the Turks and a small part of Romania (the area of Athens and Peloponnese) was free again.

In order to efface Romanity from historical reality, the Great Powers of that time (Imperial Russia, along with French and British Empires) refused to recognize the state as Romania but only as Greece/Hellas. In parallel, the terms “Byzantium” and “Byzantine Empire” (used for the first time in 1557 by Hieronymus Wolf) were deliberately generalized in use instead of the correct “Romania” and “Roman Empire”. Moreover, these Foreign Powers, in order to control the situation, put a Bavarian prince called Otto as “King of Greece” and since then, for almost two centuries, systematic brain-washing efforts have been made using the local elits, to make the citizens forget their Romanity. This confussion regarding the identity and the consequent loss of orientation, is the cause of the generalized crisis encountered in the area.

However, their goal (effacement of Romanity) has not been achieved and will never been achieved.

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Etymology of west

Posted by Johannes on 22 March 2010

Origin of west

The word west derives from the Latin vesper (evening, west), which is a transliteration of the Greek hesperos (evening, west).
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From the same route:
vespers, vespertine
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In Romeika (modern Greek, the language of Romei/Romans/Ρωμηοί)
a) esperinos: vespers [εσπερινός]
b) espera: evening [εσπέρα]
c) kalispera: good evening [kali (good)+espera (evening); καλησπέρα]
d) Esperia: West Europe [Εσπερία]
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Η λέξη west (δύση, δυτικός) προέρχεται από το Λατινικό vesper (απόγευμα, δύση), το οποίο αποτελεί μεταγραφή του ελληνικού έσπερος.
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Post 136.

In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

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Etymology of Catherine / Katherine.

Posted by Johannes on 14 March 2010

Origin of Catherine / Katherine.
Katherine is a feminine name, which comes from the Greek name Aikaterine (Αικατερίνη), of debated origin and meaning.

Theories include:
a) from the Greek Katharsis (see Aristotle’s Poetics), meaning to purge or to cleanse -pure/purity of emotion

b) from the Greek word hekáteros (ἑκάτερος), meaning each of the two, singly

c) from the Greek goddess Hecate.

d) from the Greek word aikía (αἰκία ) injurious treatment

The Latin-speaking Romans, through folk etymology, associated the name with the Greek katharós (καθαρός) pure, which led to the variant spelling Katharine/Katharina.

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Other forms of the name:

Romeika (Modern Greek): Aikaterine (Αἰκατερίνη ) Katerina, Katina, Katia

English: Caitlin, Caitlyn, Caren, Carin, Cate, Cathanne, Catharine, Catherin, Catherine, Cathie, Cathleen, Cathryn, Cathy, Kaety, Kait, Kaitlin, Kaitlyn, Kaity, Karena, Karen, Karyn, Kate, Katelin, Katharine, Katherina, Katheryn ,Kathy, Kathi, Kathie, Kathleen, Kathlyn, Kathryn, Kathy, Katie, Katlyn, Katrina, Katy

French: Carine, Catant, Cathanne, Cathareau, Catherine, Katrin

German: Cathrin, Catrin, Karin, Karen, Katarina, Katarine, Katharina, Katharine, Katherina, Kathrin, Katinka, Katrin, Katrina

Italian: Catarina, Caterina

Spanish: Catalina, Catarina, Catherina

Russian: Jekaterina, Katerina, Katia, Katinka, Katushka, Katya, Yekaterina

Turkish: Akaterina, Katarina

Welsh: Cadi, Catrin

Irish: Cáit, Caitlín, Caitria, Caitrín, Caitríona, Catherine, Cathleen, Catraoine

Danish: Caja, Catja

Swedish: Cajsa, Catharina, Cathrine ,Catrine, Kai, Kajsa, Karin, Katrina

Portoguese: Carina, Catarina, Caterina, Cátia

Roumanian: Cătălina, Catina, Catinca, Ecaterina

Catalan: Caterina

Dutch: Catharina, Cato, Kaatje

Bulgarian: Ekaterina, Katerina

Armenian:Gadara, Gadarine, Kadara, Kadarine

Georgian: Ekaterine

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St Catherine

(Monastery of St Catherine at Mount Sinai: http://www.sinaimonastery.com/)

Post 135.

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Tags within the post: etymology of Catherine, etymology of Katherine, etymology of Caitlin, etymology of Caitlyn, etymology of Caren, etymology of Carin, etymology of Cate, etymology of Cathanne, etymology of Catharine, etymology of Catherin, etymology of Catherine, etymology of Cathie, etymology of Cathleen, etymology of Cathryn, etymology of Cathy, etymology of Kaety, etymology of Kait, etymology of Kaitlin, etymology of Kaitlyn, etymology of Kaity, etymology of Karena, etymology of Karen, etymology of Karyn, etymology of Kate, etymology of Katelin, etymology of Katharine, etymology of Katherina, etymology of Katheryn, etymology of Kathy, etymology of Kathi, etymology of Kathie, etymology of Kathleen, etymology of Kathlyn, etymology of Kathryn, etymology of Kathy, etymology of Katie, etymology of Katlyn, etymology of Katrina, etymology of Katy, origin of proper names, origin of Catherine, origin of Katherine, origin of Caitlin, origin of Caitlyn, origin of Caren, origin of Carin, origin of Cate, origin of Cathanne, origin of Catharine, origin of Catherin, origin of Catherine, origin of Cathie, origin of Cathleen, origin of Cathryn, origin of Cathy, origin of Kaety, origin of Kait, origin of Kaitlin, origin of Kaitlyn, origin of Kaity, origin of Karena, origin of Karen, origin of Karyn, origin of Kate, origin of Katelin, origin of Katharine, origin of Katherina, origin of Katheryn, origin of Kathy, origin of Kathi, origin of Kathie, origin of Kathleen, origin of Kathlyn, origin of Kathryn, origin of Kathy, origin of Katie, origin of Katlyn, origin of Katrina, origin of Katy

Sources:

a) http://www.behindthename.com/name/katherine

b) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katherine_(given_name)#Origin_and_meaning

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In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

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Etymology of oval, ovary

Posted by Johannes on 1 March 2010

Origin of oval, ovary

The word oval comes from the Latin ovalis (egg-shaped, literally of or pertaining to an egg) from ovum (egg), which derives from the Greek Aeolic form oFon (egg; ωFόν) of oon (egg; ωόν ).
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In modern Greek (Romeika, the language of Romei/Romans/Ρωμηοί)

a) ootheque: ovary (oo-theque: lit. collection/library of eggs) [ωοθήκη]

b) oario: ovum [ωάριο]

c) ooides: ovoid, egg-shaped, oval [ωοειδές]
{Gr. ooides –> L. ovoides –> En. ovoid}

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From the same root:
ova, ovarian, ovate, ovoid, ovule, ovum
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Η λέξη oval προέρχεται από το λατινικό ovalis (ωοειδής), από το ovum (αβγό), το οποίο προέρχεται από την Αιολική μορφή ωFόν του Ωόν (αβγό).

 

Post 134.

 


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Etymology of fart

Posted by Johannes on 1 March 2010

Origin of fart
The word fart (a flatus expelled through the anus) comes from the Old English verb fert-en, which derives from the ancient Greek verb perd-ome (fart).

In modern Greek (Romeika, the language of Romei/Romans/Ρωμηοί)
a) perdome: fart (v) [πέρδομαι]
b) porde: fart (n) [πορδή]

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Η λέξη fart (πέρδομαι) προέρχεται από το ελληνικό ρήμα πέρδομαι.

Post 133.

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Etymology of trophy, trope

Posted by Johannes on 1 March 2010

Origin of trophy, trope
The word trophy (a prize of war) comes from the Latin trophæum (a sign of victory), originally tropæum, which is a transliteration of the Greek tropaion (monument of an enemy’s defeat) from neut. of adj. tropaios (of defeat) from trope (a rout) originally “a turning” (of the enemy).

 
In modern Greek (Romeika, the language of Romei/Romans/Ρωμηοί)

 a) tropeo: trophy [τρόπαιο]

b) trope: change, turn [τροπή]
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From the same root:
English: trope
French: trophee, trope, tropologie
Italian: trofeo, tropo, tropologia
Spanish: trofeo, tropo, tropologia
German: Trophae, Trope
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Η λέξη trophy (τρόπαιο) προέρχεται από το Λατινικό trophæum (αρχικά tropæum), το οποίο αποτελεί μεταγραφεί του Ελληνικού τρόπαιον.
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Post 132.
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link: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=trophy&searchmode=none
In blogger: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/

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