English Words of (Unexpected) Greek Origin.

Learn easily Greek using the roots of the English words.

Posts Tagged ‘etymologie’

Etymology of grotesque

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The adj. grotesque comes from the French crotesque from the Italian grottesco, (lit. “of a cave,”), from grotta, from the Latin crypta (vault, cavern), which is a transliteration of the Greek crypte [crypt, hidden place; Gr: κρύπτη]. Initially the phrase “figura grottesca” (or “pitture grottesche”) was referring to the paintings of the caves.
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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) grotesco: grotesque [Gr.: γκροτέσκο; loanword]
b) crypte: crypt [Gr.: κρύπτη]
c) crypto (or cryvo): to hide, conceal, secrete [Gr.: κρύβω]

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Etymology of graffiti

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The wοrd graffiti comes from the Italian graffiti, plural of graffito (a scribbling), from graffiare (to scribble) from the Greek grafein (to write, to draw, to scratch; Gr: γράφειν].
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From the same root: -graphy (eg. geography), graphologist, graphic, praphics, graphite .
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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) grafo: (to write, to draw, to scratch, to type; Gr: γράφω].
b) grapsimo: handwriting [Gr: γράψιμο]
c) graphologos: graphologist [Gr: γραφολόγος]
d) engrafo: document, deed [Gr: έγγραφο]
e) graphica: graphics [Gr: γραφικά]
f) graphites: graphite [Gr: γραφίτης]

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Post 212.   More.

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Etymology of gas

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The word gas is simply a phonetic transcription of the Greek word chaos [Gr: χάος]. It was first used in the early 17th century by the chemist J.B. Van Helmont.
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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) haos: chaos [Gr: χάος].
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Etymology of carrot

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The word carrot comes from the old French carrotte, from the Latin carota, which is a transliteration of the Greek caroton (carrot; Gr: καρωτόν).

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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):

a) caroto: carrot [Gr: καρώτο]

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From the same root: carotene, carotenoids

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Post 209. 

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Etymology of super and over

Posted by Johannes on 10 December 2011

Both super and over come from the Latin super, which merely is a transliteration of the Greek yper/hyper [over, super; Gr: υπέρ].

In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) yper: super, over, hyper- [Gr: υπέρ]
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Etymology of triumph

Posted by Johannes on 10 December 2011

Triumph comes from the old French triumphe from the Latin triumphus (achievement, a success, procession for a victorious general or admiral), which merely is a transliteration of the Greek thriambos.

In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) thriamvos: triumph [Gr: θρίαμβος]
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Etymology of typhoon

Posted by Johannes on 30 August 2011

The word typhoon (violent storm, whirlwind, tornado), comes from the Greek typhon [whirlwind; Gr: τυφών], personified as a giant, father of the winds, perhaps from typhein “to smoke” (origin of the word typhus).
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In modern Greek (Romeika):

a) typhonas: typhoon [Gr: τυφώνας]

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Etymology of dean

Posted by Johannes on 30 August 2011

Dean comes from the old French deien, from the Latin decanus “head of a group of 10 monks in a monastery”, from earlier secular meaning “commander of 10 soldiers” (which was extended to civil administrators in the late empire), a transliteration of the Greek decanos [Gr: δεκανός], from deca “ten”. College sense is from 1570s.
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In modern Greek (Romeika):

 

a) deca: ten [Gr: δέκα]

 

b) deca-: deca- [Gr: δέκα-] (decathlon, decalogue etc.)

 

c) decaneas: corporal, leader of ten soldiers [Gr: δεκανέας]
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Etymology of anthem

Posted by Johannes on 9 July 2011

Origin of the word anthem
The word anthem comes from the old English ontemn, antefn, “a composition (in prose or verse) sung antiphonally,” from the Latin antefana, a transliteration of the Greek antiphona “verse response”.

From the same root:
antiphon, phonetic etc

In modern Greek (Romeika)
a) antiphono: antiphon [Gr: αντίφωνο]
b) anti-: anti-[Gr: αντι-]
c) anti: instead of, in place of, as, for [Gr: αντί]
d) phone or better phoni: voice [Gr: φωνή]
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Post 185.

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Etymology of April

Posted by Johannes on 9 July 2011

Origin of the word April

The word April comes from the old French Avril, from the Latin Aprilis (month of Venus, the second month of the ancient Roman calendar, dedicated to the goddess Venus) from Apru, a transliteration of the Greek Aphro from Aphrodite (Venus; Gr: Αφροδίτη).

In modern Greek (Romeika)
a) Aprilis: April [Gr: Απρίλης]

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Post 184.

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/April#Etymology

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