English Words of (Unexpected) Greek Origin.

Learn easily Greek using the roots of the English words.

Archive for February, 2011

Etymology of cinnamon

Posted by Johannes on 27 February 2011

Origin of the word cinnamon

The word cinnamon comes from the old French cinnamone from the Latin cinnamomum/cinnamum (cinnamon) [also used as a term of endearment], which is a transliteration of the Greek cinnamomon (cinnamon; Gr.: κιννάμωμον).
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Post 169.
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Etymology of chop (to cut)

Posted by Johannes on 27 February 2011

Origin of the word chop (to cut)
Τhe word chop (to cut) comes from the old French coper (to cut, cut off), which, most probably, is derived from the Greek verb copto (to cut; Gr: κόπτω).

In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) copto or covo: to cut [Gr.: κόπτω or κόβω]
b) copi: cutting [Gr.: κοπή]

Post 168

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Etymology of chop (shift quickly)

Posted by Johannes on 27 February 2011

Origin of the word chop (shift quickly)
The word chop (shift quickly) comes from the old English ceapian (to bargain) from the Latin caupo from the Greek cape (see etymology of cheap).
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Post 167.

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Etymology of disaster

Posted by Johannes on 19 February 2011

Origin of the word disaster

The word disaster comes from the Middle French désastre from the old Italian disastro, which  comes from the Greek pejorative prefix dis– (bad; Gr: δυσ-) + aster (star; Gr: ἀστήρ). So disaster lit. means “bad star”. The sense is astrological, of a calamity blamed on an unfavorable position of a planet.


In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) asteri or aster: star [Gr: αστέρι or αστήρ]

Post: 166.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disaster

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Etymology of chameleon

Posted by Johannes on 19 February 2011

Origin of the word chameleon
The word chameleon comes from the Latin chamaeleon, which is a transliteration of the Greek chamaileon from chamai (on the ground; Gr: χαμαί] + leon [lion; Gr: λέων].

In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) hameleon: chameleon [Gr: χαμαιλέων]
b) hamo: on the ground [Gr: χάμω]
c) leon or liontari: lion [Gr: λέων or λιοντάρι]
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Post: 165
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