ENGLISH WORDS AND GREEK COGNATES.

Learn easily Greek via the linguistic relationships and the roots of the English words.

Archive for November, 2010

Etymology of caliber

Posted by Johannes on 16 November 2010

Caliber comes from the old French calibre (14c.), from the Arabic qalib “a mold, last”, which derives from the Greek calapous [Gr: καλάπους] “a shoemaker’s last” lit. “little wooden foot,” from calon “wood” + pous “foot”.*

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From the same root: calibrate, calibration.

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In modern Greek:
a) calapodi: a shoemaker’s last, a little wooden foot [Gr: καλαπόδι]

b) calibraro: calibrate [Gr:καλιμπράρω], loanword

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* Babiniotis G.: Etymological Lexicon of Modern Greek Language p614 and p615

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Etymology of pedicure, pedestrian, pedicle, pedestal.

Posted by Johannes on 16 November 2010

Pedicure, care of feet, from the French pédicure, from the Latin pes (gen. pedis) “foot”, which is related to the Greek Aeolic pous (gen. podos) “foot” + and curare (care).

 

From the same root: pedestrian, pedicle, pedestal, pedicurist, pedicular, foot.

In modern Greek.
a) podi: foot [πόδι]
b) pezos: pedestrian [πεζός]

OED

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Etymology of foot.

Posted by Johannes on 16 November 2010

The word foot comes from the Latin pes “foot” (gen. pedos), which is related to the Greek Attic pous “foot” (gen. podos; πούς).

 


In modern Greek.
a) podi: foot [πόδι]
b) podosphero: football [podo- (foot) + spher (sphere, ball); ποδόσφαιρο]

OED

 

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