English Words of (Unexpected) Greek Origin.

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Archive for the ‘C’ Category

Etymology of cook, cuisine, kitchen

Posted by Johannes on 7 January 2013

The word cook (n) comes from the Latin cocus (cook) from the verb coquo[to cook, to think, to be unquiet, to worry (about), to mix], which most probably derives from the Greek verb cycao/cucao [stir up, mix together; Gr:κυκάω].
Others etymologize coquo from the Greek verb pesso [to cook, to boil, to make something soft (Gr.: πέσσω); Att.: petto (πέττω); later pepto (πέπτω), peptic].
Finally, a few etymologize coquo from the Greek verb ceo (burn; Gr: καίω).

From the same root: 
En: cooker, cookery, cuisine, biscuit, kitchen
Ger: kochen, kuche
It: cuocere, cucina, biscotto
Fr: cuire, cuisine, biscuit

In modern Greek:
a) cyceon: mix of dissimilar things, confusion, disorder [κυκεών]
b) cusina: cuisine, kitchen [κουζίνα; reborrowing]
c) biscoto: biscuit [μπισκότο; reborrowing]

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Etymology of cabaret

Posted by Johannes on 22 December 2012

The word cabaret (lit. tavern) comes from the old French camberete, fromcambre, from the Latin camera, transliteration of the Greek camara. See also: “Etymology of camera” here, and “Etymology of chamber” here.

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Etymology of chamber

Posted by Johannes on 22 December 2012

The word chamber comes from the old French chambre (room, chamber), from the Latin camera (vaulted room), which is merely a transliteration of the Greek camara [Gr: καμάρα]. See also the post entitled “Etymology of camera”, here.

Post 224.

 

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Etymology of canvas

Posted by Johannes on 2 June 2012

The word canvas (an extremely heavy-duty plain-woven fabric) comes from the old French canevas, from cannapaceus (made of hemp), from the Latin cannabis, a transliteration of the the Greek cannabis (hemp).

 
 
In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) camvas: canvas [Gr: καμβάς]
b) cannavis: hemp, cannabis [Gr: κάνναβις]
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Etymology of canteen

Posted by Johannes on 2 June 2012

The word canteen (store in a military camp) comes from the French cantine from the Italian cantina (wine cellar, vault) from the Latin canto (corner), which derives from the Greek word canthos(canthus, corner of the eye; Gr: κανθός).

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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) canthos: canthus [Gr: κανθός]
b) cantina: canteen [Gr: καντίνα; loanword ]
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See also (in Greek) “Etymological Dictionary of Modern Greek” by G. Babiniotis p.628 and EP21.
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Etymology of camera

Posted by Johannes on 2 June 2012

The word camera (a device that records and stores images; vaulted building), comes from the Latin camera (vaulted room), which is a transliteration of the Greek word camara (a vault, arched roof or ceiling, vaulted chamber; room). The word was also used as a short for camera obscura (dark chamber; a black box with a lens that could project images of external objects), and thus it became the word for “picture-taking device”.

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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) camera: camera [Gr: κάμερα; loanword]
b) camara: arch, arcade [Gr: καμάρα]
c) camara: room [Gr: κάμαρα]

d) camariera: chambermaid [Gr: καμαριέρα]
e) camarini: dressing room, green room [Gr: καμαρίνι]

 

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Etymology of crypt

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The word crypt (vault, cavern) comes from the Latin crypta (vault, cavern), from the Greek crypte, fem. of cryptos [hidden; Gr: κρυπτός], verbal adj. from cryptein [to hide, to conceal; Gr: κρύπτειν]. See also “etymology of grotesque” here.
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From the same root:
cryptic, crypto-, cryptogam, cryptogram, cryptographer.
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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) crypte: crypt [Gr.: κρύπτη]
b) crypto (or cryvo): to hide, conceal, secrete [Gr.: κρύπτω or κρύβω].
c) cryptographos: cryptographer [Gr.: κρυπτογράφος]
d) cryptographima: cryptogram, coded message [Gr.: κρυπτογράφημα]
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Post 214. More

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Etymology of carrot

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The word carrot comes from the old French carrotte, from the Latin carota, which is a transliteration of the Greek caroton (carrot; Gr: καρωτόν).

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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):

a) caroto: carrot [Gr: καρώτο]

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From the same root: carotene, carotenoids

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Post 209. 

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Etymology of calm

Posted by Johannes on 2 October 2011

The word calm (tranquility, quiet, peace) comes from the old French calme, from the Italian calma, from the Latin cauma (heat of the mid-day sun), which is a transliteration of the Greek kauma [Gr: καύμα] from the verb kaio (pronounced as keo), to burn [Gr: καίω]. Spelling influenced by L. calere “to be hot”.
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In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) kauma (pronounced as kavma): heat of the mid-day sun [Gr: καύμα]
b) keo: to burn [Gr: καίω]
c) encaustiki: encaustic [Gr: εγκαυστική]
d) encauma: n burn, scald [Gr: έγκαυμα]
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Etymology of columbarium, Columbus. Saint Columba.

Posted by Johannes on 1 May 2011

Origin of the word columbarium, Columbus. Saint Columba.
A columbarium is a place for the respectful and usually public storage of cinerary urns, a vault with niches for urns containing the ashes of cremated bodies. The term comes from the Latin columba (dove, dovecote) and originally referred to compartmentalized housing for doves and pigeons. The word columba comes from the Greek word colymbis [wild ducks or wild birds that use to dive into the see water; Gr.: κολυμβίς] from the verb colymbo (to dive, duck; Gr.: κολυμπώ).
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From the same root:
Columbus [From the Greek Colymbos (diver), Gr.: κόλυμβος], Columbia, Colombia etc.


In modern Greek (Romeika)

 a) colymbo: swim, bath [Gr.: κολυμπώ ]

b) colymbi (or colymbisi): swimming [Gr.: κολύμπι or κολύμβηση]

c) colymbitirio: swimming-pool, lido [Gr.: κολυμβυτήριο]

d) colymbitis: swimmer [Gr.: κολυμβητής]

 

e) colymbithra: font [Gr.: κολυμβήθρα]

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbarium
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Saint Columba

 Saint Columba was a sixth-century Orthodox Irish saint, who founded an important monastery on the Scottish island of Iona.


In the early centuries of Christianity the name Columba was popular, because the “dove” is a Cristian symbol for the Holy Spirit and peace.

See more on Saint Columba at: http://stcolumbamonastery.org/about/our-patron/

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