English Words of (Unexpected) Greek Origin.

Learn easily Greek using the roots of the English words.

Posts Tagged ‘rumca’

Etymology of plus, plural

Posted by Johannes on 1 January 2013

The word plus comes from the Latin plus (more) from the Greek pleos [more, in greater number, more than; Gr.: πλέος].

From the same root: 
plural, pluri- pluralism, plurarity, pluralize, pluralist, pleo- (pleomorphic etc), poly-, plethora


In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca)

a) pleon: more [Gr: πλέον]

b) pleonasma: surplus, excess [Gr: πλεόνασμα]

c) pleonasmos: pleonasm [Gr: πλεονασμός ]

d) pleonektima: advantage [Gr: πλεονέκτημα]

e) plethos: a lot of, a large number of [Gr: πλήθος]

f) plethintikos: plural [Gr: πληθυντικός]

g) plethismos: population [Gr: πληθυσμός]

h) plethora: plethora, plenty [Gr: πληθώρα]

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Etymology of canvas

Posted by Johannes on 2 June 2012

The word canvas (an extremely heavy-duty plain-woven fabric) comes from the old French canevas, from cannapaceus (made of hemp), from the Latin cannabis, a transliteration of the the Greek cannabis (hemp).

 
 
In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) camvas: canvas [Gr: καμβάς]
b) cannavis: hemp, cannabis [Gr: κάνναβις]
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Etymology of gas

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The word gas is simply a phonetic transcription of the Greek word chaos [Gr: χάος]. It was first used in the early 17th century by the chemist J.B. Van Helmont.
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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) haos: chaos [Gr: χάος].
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Post 211.  More.

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Etymology of aria

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The word aria comes from the Italian aria, from the Latin aerem, accusative of aer (air), which is a transliteration of the Greek aer [air; Gr: αήρ]. See also etymolology of air here.
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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) Aria: aria [Gr: άρια]

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Etymology of unity, union, unit

Posted by Johannes on 10 December 2011

The word unity comes from the French unite, from Latin unitatem, from unus (one) from the Greek oenos (one). See also “Etymology of one” here.

From the same root: union, unit

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Etymology of one

Posted by Johannes on 10 December 2011

The word one comes from the Latin unus, which in turn derives from the Greek oenos [one, ace in dice; Gr: οινός].
Note: Some etymologize unus from the gen. enos of eis [one; Gr: εις].

From the same root: unity, unique.

In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) enas:
one [Gr: ένας]
b) enotita: unity [Gr: ενότητα]
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Etymology of labor

Posted by Johannes on 3 December 2011

The verb labor (perform manual or physical work; work hard, take pains) comes from the French labourer, from the Latin laborate/labor, which most probably derives from the Greek verb lamvano/lavo (to undertake; Gr: λαμβάνω).

Note: Some etymologize labor from the Greek word laepsiros [one who runs very fast, agile, speedy; la+aepsiros; Gr: λαιψηρός, λα+αιψηρός].

From the same root: laboratory, laborious, collaborate, collaboration.

In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca)
a) lamvano: receive, take, get, obtain [Gr: λαμβάνω]
b) analamvano: undertake, resume, retake [Gr: αναλαμβάνω]
c) syllamvano: arrest, catch, take, capture [Gr: συλλαμβάνω]
d) lipsi: receiving, receipt, reception, taking [Gr: λήψη]

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See also: Luke 10:40 “Κύριε, οὐ μέλει σοι ὅτι ἡ ἀδελφή μου μόνην με κατέλιπε διακονεῖν; εἰπὲ οὖν αὐτῇ ἵνα μοι συν-αντι-λάβηται.” , “…Tell her to help me (to work with me, to com-laborate/to collaborate with me)”

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Etymology of disaster

Posted by Johannes on 19 February 2011

Origin of the word disaster

The word disaster comes from the Middle French désastre from the old Italian disastro, which  comes from the Greek pejorative prefix dis– (bad; Gr: δυσ-) + aster (star; Gr: ἀστήρ). So disaster lit. means “bad star”. The sense is astrological, of a calamity blamed on an unfavorable position of a planet.


In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) asteri or aster: star [Gr: αστέρι or αστήρ]

Post: 166.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disaster

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