ENGLISH WORDS AND GREEK COGNATES.

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Archive for the ‘D’ Category

Etymology of dragon, dragoon

Posted by Johannes on 2 June 2012

The word dragon comes from the Old French dragon, which in turn comes from the Latin draconem  [huge serpent, dragon], from the Greek word drakon [serpent, giant seafish; Gr: δράκων].
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From the same root: dragoon, dragonet
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In modern Greek:
a) drakos: dragon [Gr: δράκος]

OED

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Etymology of donation

Posted by Johannes on 3 December 2011

The word donation comes from the Old French donacion from the Latin donationem (nom. donatio) from donum/dorum (gift), which is related to the Greek doron [gift; Gr: δώρον].

From the same root: donate, donator, donatory

In modern Greek:
a) doro: gift [Gr: δώρο]
b) dorizo: donate, to make a gift [Gr: δωρίζω]
c) doritis: giver, donator [Gr: δωρητής]
d) dorea: donation, gift [Gr: δωρεά]
e) dorean: gratis, free (of charge) [Gr: δωρεάν]

OED
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Etymology of decade

Posted by Johannes on 30 August 2011

Decade, “ten parts” (of anything), comes from the old French décade (14c.), from the Latin decadem (nom. decas), from the Greek decas (gen. dekados) “group of ten.” Meaning “period of ten years” is 1590s in English.
See also “etymology of dean” here .
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In modern Greek:
a) decada: ten parts [Gr: δεκάδα]
b) decaetia: ten years period, decade [Gr: δεκαετία]
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Etymology of dime

Posted by Johannes on 30 August 2011

The word dime (coin worth one tenth of a US dollar, a 10 cent coin) comes from the old French disme (a tenth part), from the Latin decima [tenth (part)], from decem (ten), related to the Greek deca (ten). See also “etymology of dean” here .
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Etymology of December

Posted by Johannes on 30 August 2011

The word December comes from the Latin December (tenth month of the old Roman calendar, which began with March), from decem (ten), related to the Greek deca [ten; Gr: δέκα].

See also “etymology of dean” here .
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In modern Greek:
a) Decembrios (better pronounced as Dekemvrios): December [Gr: Δεκέμβριος]

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Etymology of dean

Posted by Johannes on 30 August 2011

Dean comes from the old French deien, from the Latin decanus “head of a group of 10 monks in a monastery”, from earlier secular meaning “commander of 10 soldiers” (which was extended to civil administrators in the late empire), from the Greek decanos [Gr: δεκανός], from deca “ten”. College sense is from 1570s.
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In modern Greek:

a) deca: ten [Gr: δέκα]

b) deca-: deca- [Gr: δέκα-] (dec-athlon, deca-logue etc.)

c) decaneas: corporal, leader of ten soldiers [Gr: δεκανέας]

OED
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Etymology of disaster

Posted by Johannes on 19 February 2011

Origin of the word disaster

The word disaster comes from the Middle French désastre from the old Italian disastro, which  comes from the Greek pejorative prefix dis– (bad; Gr: δυσ-) + aster (star; Gr: ἀστήρ). So disaster lit. means “bad star”. The sense is astrological, of a calamity blamed on an unfavorable position of a planet.


In modern Greek:
a) asteri or aster: star [Gr: αστέρι or αστήρ]

OED

WKP

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Etymology of devil

Posted by Johannes on 28 March 2010

Origin of devil

The word devil comes from the Latin diabolus (devil), which is a transliteration of the Greek diabolos (devil; diavolos; διάβολος) from the verb diaballo (to insinuate things (against sb), put sb in a bad light, slander, calumniate; from dia- “across, through” + ballo “to throw”; diavallo; διαβάλλω).
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From the same root
English: diabolic, diablerie, ballistic
French: diable, diabolique, diablerie
Italian: diavolo, dabolico, diavoleria
Spanish: diablo, dabolico, diablura
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In modern Greek:
a) diavolos: devil [διάβολος]
b) diavallo: to insinuate things (against sb), put sb in a bad light, slander, calumniate [διαβάλλω]
c) diavoli: calumny, false accusation [διαβολή]
d) diavolicos: diabolic [διαβολικός]
e) vallo: attack, hit out [βάλλω]
f) vallisticos: ballistic [βαλλιστικός]
g) voli: throw, shot [βολή]
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Η λέξη devil προέρχεται από το ελληνικό διάβολος.

.OED

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Etymology of daughter

Posted by Johannes on 8 August 2009

Origin of daughter
 

The word daughter comes from the proto-German dhukter, which is related to the Greek thygater (daughter; θυγάτηρ).

 

In German: Tochter

In Swedish: dotter

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In modern Greek:
a) thygatera: daughter [θυγατέρα]

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OED

 

Η λέξη daughter (θυγατέρα, κόρη) προέρχεται από το πρωτο-Γερμανικό dhukter, το οποίο σχετίζεται το ελληνικό θυγάτηρ.

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daughter

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Etymology of domus, domestic, domain.

Posted by Johannes on 12 April 2009

Etymology of domus, domestic, domain.
Domus
(house) is related to the Greek word domos (house, building; δόμος) from the verb demo (to built, to construct; δέμω).

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From the same root

English: domestic, dome, domination, dominion, don, dona, domicile, domain, dominus, predominance, danger etc.

French: dome, domicile, domicilier, don, domaine, domestique, domestiquer, domesticite, dominer, domination, dominance, Dimanche, Dame, dominion, domino, dangereux, etc.

Italian: duomo, domicilo, don, dominio, domestico, domesticare, dominare, dominazione, dominatore, predominio, Domenica, damo, damigiana etc

German: Dom, Domizil, Domane, dominieren, Dame etc

Hispanic: domicilio, domiciliar, don, dona, dominio, dueno, domestico, domesticar, domesticidad, dominar, dominacion, dominator, predominio, Domingo, doncella, damajuana etc.

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In modern Greek
a) domi: structure [δομή]
b) ecodomi:
construction, building [οικοδομή]
c) ecodomima:
building, structure [οικοδόμημα]
d) ecodomos:
builder [οικοδόμος]
e) ecodomo:
to build, to construct [οικοδομώ]

OED

Το Λατινικό domus (οικία) σχετίζεται με το Ελληνικό δόμος από το ρήμα δέμω (κτίζω, οικοδομώ).

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