ENGLISH WORDS AND GREEK COGNATES.

Learn easily Greek via the linguistic relationships and the roots of the English words.

Posts Tagged ‘προέλευση αγγλικών λέξεων’

Etymology of plus, plural

Posted by Johannes on 1 January 2013

The word plus comes from the Latin plus (more) is related to the Greek pleos [more, in greater number, more than; Gr.: πλέος].

From the same root: 
plural, pluri- pluralism, plurarity, pluralize, pluralist, pleo- (pleomorphic etc), poly-, plethora


In modern Greek

a) pleon: more [Gr: πλέον]

b) pleonasma: surplus, excess [Gr: πλεόνασμα]

c) pleonasmos: pleonasm [Gr: πλεονασμός ]

d) pleonektima: advantage [Gr: πλεονέκτημα]

e) plethos: a lot of, a large number of [Gr: πλήθος]

f) plethintikos: plural [Gr: πληθυντικός]

g) plethismos: population [Gr: πληθυσμός]

h) plethora: plethora, plenty [Gr: πληθώρα]

 

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Etymology of carrot

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The word carrot comes from the old French carrotte, from the Latin carota, which is a transliteration of the Greek caroton (carrot; Gr: καρώτον).

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In modern Greek:

a) caroto: carrot [Gr: καρώτο]

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From the same root: carotene, carotenoids

 

OED

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Etymology of triumph

Posted by Johannes on 10 December 2011

Triumph comes from the old French triumphe from the Latin triumphus (achievement, a success, procession for a victorious general or admiral), which merely is a transliteration of the Greek thriambos.

In modern Greek:
a) thriamvos: triumph [Gr: θρίαμβος]

OED

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Etymology of unity, union, unit

Posted by Johannes on 10 December 2011

The word unity comes from the French unite, from Latin unitatem, from unus (one), which is related to the Greek oenos (ace).

See also “Etymology of one” here.

From the same root: union, unit

OED

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Etymology of brillinat

Posted by Johannes on 11 September 2011

Brilliant comes from the French brilliant (sparkling, shining) from the Italian brillare (sparkle, whirl), from the Latin berillare (to shine like a beryl), from berillus (beryl, precious stone), from the Latin beryllus, which is a transliteration of the Greek beryllos [beryl, precious stone; Gr: βήρυλλος].
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In modern Greek:
a) beryllos (or better pronounced as viryllos): beryl [Gr: βήρυλλος]
b) beryllio: beryllium (Be) [Gr: βηρύλλιο]
c) brilanti (or brigianti): diampond, brilliant [Gr: μπριλάντι]
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Fr: briller, brillantine, brillant; It: brillare; Grm: Brillant, Brille

OED
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Etymology of April

Posted by Johannes on 9 July 2011

Origin of the word April

The word April comes from the old French Avril, from the Latin Aprilis (month of Venus, the second month of the ancient Roman calendar, dedicated to the goddess Venus) from Apru, a transliteration of the Greek Aphro from Aphrodite (Venus; Gr: Αφροδίτη).

In modern Greek:
a) Aprilis: April [Gr: Απρίλης]

WKN

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Etymology of cinema

Posted by Johannes on 3 April 2011

Origin of the word cinema .

The word cinema comes from the French cinéma, shortened from cinématographe, coined 1890s by Lumiere brothers, who invented it, from the Greek cinema (movement; better pronounced as kinima; Gr: κίνημα), from the verb cino (to move; better pronounced as kino; Gr: κινώ).
See also the post entitled “Etymology of cite” here.
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From the same root
English: cinematography, cinerama, cinemascope, kinetics, kinematics, kineto
French: cinema, cinematographe,
Italian: cinematografo,
Spanish: cine, cinematica,
German: Kino, Kinematograph
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 In modern Greek:
a) cinema: cinema [Gr: σινεμά
b) kinima: movement [Gr: κίνημα]
c) cinimatographos (better pronounced as kinimatographos): cinema [Gr: κινηματογράφος]
d) kino: to move [Gr:κινώ]

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Etymology of cite

Posted by Johannes on 3 April 2011

Origin of the word cite

The verb cite (to summon) comes from the Latin citare, from ciere, from cieo (to move, set in motion, stir, move), which is related to the Greek verb cieo/cineo (I move, stir, rouse, summon; Gr: κιέω/κιώ/κινέω).

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From the same root: 

English: cinema, excite, incite, citation, recite, recital .

French: citer, citateur, inciter, reciter .

Italian: citare, citatire, incitare, recitare .

Spanish: citar, cita, excitar .

German: zitieren, Zitat .

In modern Greek: .

a) cino (better pronounced as kino): move [Gr: κινώ] .

b) cinisi (better pronounced as kinisi; remember the related word kinetics): movement [Gr: κίνηση] .

c) tsitato: citation, a part of a text with an important message [Gr: τσιτάτο; loanword] .

d) cinema: cinema [Gr: σινεμά; loanword] .

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OED

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Etymology of chameleon

Posted by Johannes on 19 February 2011

Origin of the word chameleon
The word chameleon comes from the Latin chamaeleon, which is a transliteration of the Greek chamaileon from chamai (on the ground; Gr: χαμαί] + leon [lion; Gr: λέων].

 

In modern Greek:
a) hameleon: chameleon [Gr: χαμαιλέων]
b) hamo: on the ground [Gr: χάμω]
c) leon or liontari: lion [Gr: λέων or λιοντάρι]

OED
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Etymology of camomile

Posted by Johannes on 23 January 2011

Origin of the word camomile

The word camomile comes from the French camomille from the Latin chamoemelon, which is a transliteration of the Greek chamaimelon [camomile, lit. earth-apple; Gr.: χαμαίμηλον] from chamai (on the ground; Gr: χαμαί) + melon (apple; Gr: μήλον). So called because of the apple-like scent of the plant.

In modern Greek:
a) hamοmili: camomile [Gr: χαμομήλι]
b) hamo: on the ground [Gr: χάμω]
c) milo: apple [Gr: μήλο]
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WKN

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