ENGLISH WORDS AND GREEK COGNATES.

Learn easily Greek via the linguistic relationships and the roots of the English words.

Posts Tagged ‘μαθαίνω ελληνικά’

Etymology of cook, cuisine, kitchen

Posted by Johannes on 7 January 2013

The word cook (n) comes from the Latin cocus (cook) from the verb coquo [to cook, to think, to be unquiet, to worry (about), to mix], which possibly is related to the Greek verb cycao/cucao [stir up, mix together; Gr: κυκάω].

Others etymologize coquo from the IE root *pekw, which is related to the Greek verb pesso [to cook, to boil, to make something soft (Gr.: πέσσω); Att.: petto (πέττω); later pepto (πέπτω), peptic].

Finally, a few etymologize coquo from the Greek verb ceo (to burn; Gr: καίω – κηίω, κηFίο).

From the same root: 
En: cooker, cookery, cuisine, biscuit, kitchen
Ger: kochen, kuche
It: cuocere, cucina, biscotto
Fr: cuire, cuisine, biscuit

In modern Greek:
a) cyceon: mix of dissimilar things, confusion, disorder [κυκεών]
b) cusina: cuisine, kitchen [κουζίνα; reborrowing]
c) biscoto: biscuit [μπισκότο; reborrowing]

OED

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Etymology of elixir

Posted by Johannes on 24 June 2012

The word elixir or philosopher’s stone, believed by alchemists to transmute baser metals into gold and/or to cure diseases and prolong life, comes from the Arabic al-iksir, from the late Greek xirion [powder for drying wounds; Gr: ξηρίον], from the Greek xiros [dry; Gr: ξηρός].
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In modern Greek:
a) xiros: dry [Gr: ξηρός]
b) xirasia: drought [Gr: ξηρασία]
c) xira: land, mainland [Gr: ξηρά]
d) xirotita: dryness, aridity [Gr: ξηρότητα]
e) elixirio: elixir [Gr: ελιξήριο; loanword]

OED

 

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Etymology of camomile

Posted by Johannes on 23 January 2011

Origin of the word camomile

The word camomile comes from the French camomille from the Latin chamoemelon, which is a transliteration of the Greek chamaimelon [camomile, lit. earth-apple; Gr.: χαμαίμηλον] from chamai (on the ground; Gr: χαμαί) + melon (apple; Gr: μήλον). So called because of the apple-like scent of the plant.

In modern Greek:
a) hamοmili: camomile [Gr: χαμομήλι]
b) hamo: on the ground [Gr: χάμω]
c) milo: apple [Gr: μήλο]
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WKN

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