English Words of (Unexpected) Greek Origin.

Learn easily Greek using the roots of the English words.

Posts Tagged ‘ετυμολογία’

Etymology of cook, cuisine, kitchen

Posted by Johannes on 7 January 2013

The word cook (n) comes from the Latin cocus (cook) from the verb coquo[to cook, to think, to be unquiet, to worry (about), to mix], which most probably derives from the Greek verb cycao/cucao [stir up, mix together; Gr:κυκάω].
Others etymologize coquo from the Greek verb pesso [to cook, to boil, to make something soft (Gr.: πέσσω); Att.: petto (πέττω); later pepto (πέπτω), peptic].
Finally, a few etymologize coquo from the Greek verb ceo (burn; Gr: καίω).

From the same root: 
En: cooker, cookery, cuisine, biscuit, kitchen
Ger: kochen, kuche
It: cuocere, cucina, biscotto
Fr: cuire, cuisine, biscuit

In modern Greek:
a) cyceon: mix of dissimilar things, confusion, disorder [κυκεών]
b) cusina: cuisine, kitchen [κουζίνα; reborrowing]
c) biscoto: biscuit [μπισκότο; reborrowing]

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Etymology of plus, plural

Posted by Johannes on 1 January 2013

The word plus comes from the Latin plus (more) from the Greek pleos [more, in greater number, more than; Gr.: πλέος].

From the same root: 
plural, pluri- pluralism, plurarity, pluralize, pluralist, pleo- (pleomorphic etc), poly-, plethora


In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca)

a) pleon: more [Gr: πλέον]

b) pleonasma: surplus, excess [Gr: πλεόνασμα]

c) pleonasmos: pleonasm [Gr: πλεονασμός ]

d) pleonektima: advantage [Gr: πλεονέκτημα]

e) plethos: a lot of, a large number of [Gr: πλήθος]

f) plethintikos: plural [Gr: πληθυντικός]

g) plethismos: population [Gr: πληθυσμός]

h) plethora: plethora, plenty [Gr: πληθώρα]

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Etymology of elixir

Posted by Johannes on 24 June 2012

The word elixir or philosopher’s stone, believed by alchemists to transmute baser metals into gold and/or to cure diseases and prolong life, comes from the Arabic al-iksir, from the late Greek xirion [powder for drying wounds; Gr: ξηρίον], from the Greek xiros [dry; Gr: ξηρός].
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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) xiros: dry [Gr: ξηρός]
b) xirasia: drought [Gr: ξηρασία]
c) xira: land, mainland [Gr: ξηρά]
d) xirotita: dryness, aridity [Gr: ξηρότητα]
e) elixirio: elixir [Gr: ελιξήριο; loanword]

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Etymology of canvas

Posted by Johannes on 2 June 2012

The word canvas (an extremely heavy-duty plain-woven fabric) comes from the old French canevas, from cannapaceus (made of hemp), from the Latin cannabis, a transliteration of the the Greek cannabis (hemp).

 
 
In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) camvas: canvas [Gr: καμβάς]
b) cannavis: hemp, cannabis [Gr: κάνναβις]
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Etymology of canteen

Posted by Johannes on 2 June 2012

The word canteen (store in a military camp) comes from the French cantine from the Italian cantina (wine cellar, vault) from the Latin canto (corner), which derives from the Greek word canthos(canthus, corner of the eye; Gr: κανθός).

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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) canthos: canthus [Gr: κανθός]
b) cantina: canteen [Gr: καντίνα; loanword ]
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See also (in Greek) “Etymological Dictionary of Modern Greek” by G. Babiniotis p.628 and EP21.
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Etymology of camera

Posted by Johannes on 2 June 2012

The word camera (a device that records and stores images; vaulted building), comes from the Latin camera (vaulted room), which is a transliteration of the Greek word camara (a vault, arched roof or ceiling, vaulted chamber; room). The word was also used as a short for camera obscura (dark chamber; a black box with a lens that could project images of external objects), and thus it became the word for “picture-taking device”.

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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) camera: camera [Gr: κάμερα; loanword]
b) camara: arch, arcade [Gr: καμάρα]
c) camara: room [Gr: κάμαρα]

d) camariera: chambermaid [Gr: καμαριέρα]
e) camarini: dressing room, green room [Gr: καμαρίνι]

 

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Etymology of serpent

Posted by Johannes on 2 June 2012

The word serpent (reptile, snake) comes from the Old French  sarpent, from the Latin serpentem [nom. serpens; snake], which derives from the Greek verb herpo / erpo (to creep; Gr: έρπω].
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From the same root: serpentine
 
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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) erpeto: serpent [Gr: ερπετό]
b) serpantina: serpentine [Gr: σερπαντίνα; loanword]
c) erpo: v. to creep [Gr: έρπω].

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Etymology of griffon, griffin

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

Griffon is a type of dog. The word griffon (also griffin or gryphon) comes from the old French grifon from the Latin gryphus / grypus, a transliteration of the Greek gryphon / gryps [Gr: γρύφων; lit. curved, hook-nosed], a legendary mythological creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle.

In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) grypas: griffin, legendary creature [Gr: γρύπας]
b) grifon: griffon [Gr: γριφόν; loanword]
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Post 215. More

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Etymology of gas

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The word gas is simply a phonetic transcription of the Greek word chaos [Gr: χάος]. It was first used in the early 17th century by the chemist J.B. Van Helmont.
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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) haos: chaos [Gr: χάος].
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Etymology of carrot

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The word carrot comes from the old French carrotte, from the Latin carota, which is a transliteration of the Greek caroton (carrot; Gr: καρωτόν).

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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):

a) caroto: carrot [Gr: καρώτο]

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From the same root: carotene, carotenoids

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Post 209. 

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