ENGLISH WORDS AND GREEK COGNATES.

Learn easily Greek via the linguistic relationships and the roots of the English words.

Posts Tagged ‘ελληνική γλώσσα’

Etymology of milk

Posted by Johannes on 14 April 2020

Etymology of milk

The word milk comes from the Proto-Germanic meluk,  which is related to the Greek verb amelgo (to milk, to draw; αμέλγω).

 

From the same root

milk (Eng); Milche (Ger)

 

In modern Greek:

a) armego: to milk [αρμέγω]

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OED

Το αγγλικό MILK (γάλα), όπως και το γερμανικό αντίστοιχο Milche (γάλα) σχετίζονται με το ρήμα αμέλγω (αρμέγω).

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Tags within the post: etymology of milk, origin of milk, etymologia des Milche, learn greek using cognates, learn Greek, etymology of Latin words, origin of Latin words, Origin of English words, etymology of English words, αμέλγω, αρμέγω, προέλευση αγγλικών λέξεων, ελληνική γλώσσα, προέλευση Λατινικών, Λατινικά, Ρωμαίικα, Greek language, english language

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Etymology of canvas

Posted by Johannes on 2 June 2012

The word canvas (an extremely heavy-duty plain-woven fabric) comes from the old French canevas, from cannapaceus (made of hemp), from the Latin cannabis, a transliteration of the the Greek cannabis (hemp).

In modern Greek:
a) camvas: canvas [Gr: καμβάς]
b) cannavis: hemp, cannabis [Gr: κάνναβις]
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Etymology of canteen

Posted by Johannes on 2 June 2012

The word canteen (store in a military camp) comes from the French cantine from the Italian cantina (wine cellar, vault) from the Latin canto (corner), which moste probably derives from the Greek word canthos(canthus, corner of the eye; Gr: κανθός).

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In modern Greek:
a) canthos: canthus [Gr: κανθός]
b) cantina: canteen [Gr: καντίνα; loanword ]
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See also (in Greek) “Etymological Dictionary of Modern Greek” by G. Babiniotis p.628 and EP21.
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Etymology of griffon, griffin

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

Griffon is a type of dog. The word griffon (also griffin or gryphon) comes from the old French grifon from the Latin gryphus / grypus, a transliteration of the Greek gryphon / gryps [Gr: γρύφων; lit. curved, hook-nosed], a legendary mythological creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle.

In modern Greek:
a) grypas: griffin, legendary creature [Gr: γρύπας]
b) grifon: griffon [Gr: γριφόν; loanword]
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WKP

 

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Etymology of aria

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The word aria comes from the Italian aria, from the Latin aerem, accusative of aer (air), which is a transliteration of the Greek aer [air; Gr: αήρ].

See also etymolology of air here.
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In modern Greek:
a) Aria: aria [Gr: άρια]

b) aeras: air [Gr: αέρας]

WKN

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Etymology of kiss

Posted by Johannes on 26 March 2012

The verb kiss comes from the old English cyssan, from the German kussen, which is related to the Greek kysso (Gr: κύσσω/κύσω; fut. of the verb kyneo, Gr: κυνέω: to kiss).

OED

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Etymology of cinema

Posted by Johannes on 3 April 2011

Origin of the word cinema .

The word cinema comes from the French cinéma, shortened from cinématographe, coined 1890s by Lumiere brothers, who invented it, from the Greek cinema (movement; better pronounced as kinima; Gr: κίνημα), from the verb cino (to move; better pronounced as kino; Gr: κινώ).
See also the post entitled “Etymology of cite” here.
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From the same root
English: cinematography, cinerama, cinemascope, kinetics, kinematics, kineto
French: cinema, cinematographe,
Italian: cinematografo,
Spanish: cine, cinematica,
German: Kino, Kinematograph
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 In modern Greek:
a) cinema: cinema [Gr: σινεμά
b) kinima: movement [Gr: κίνημα]
c) cinimatographos (better pronounced as kinimatographos): cinema [Gr: κινηματογράφος]
d) kino: to move [Gr:κινώ]

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Etymology of cite

Posted by Johannes on 3 April 2011

Origin of the word cite

The verb cite (to summon) comes from the Latin citare, from ciere, from cieo (to move, set in motion, stir, move), which is related to the Greek verb cieo/cineo (I move, stir, rouse, summon; Gr: κιέω/κιώ/κινέω).

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From the same root: 

English: cinema, excite, incite, citation, recite, recital .

French: citer, citateur, inciter, reciter .

Italian: citare, citatire, incitare, recitare .

Spanish: citar, cita, excitar .

German: zitieren, Zitat .

In modern Greek: .

a) cino (better pronounced as kino): move [Gr: κινώ] .

b) cinisi (better pronounced as kinisi; remember the related word kinetics): movement [Gr: κίνηση] .

c) tsitato: citation, a part of a text with an important message [Gr: τσιτάτο; loanword] .

d) cinema: cinema [Gr: σινεμά; loanword] .

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OED

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Etymology of disaster

Posted by Johannes on 19 February 2011

Origin of the word disaster

The word disaster comes from the Middle French désastre from the old Italian disastro, which  comes from the Greek pejorative prefix dis– (bad; Gr: δυσ-) + aster (star; Gr: ἀστήρ). So disaster lit. means “bad star”. The sense is astrological, of a calamity blamed on an unfavorable position of a planet.


In modern Greek:
a) asteri or aster: star [Gr: αστέρι or αστήρ]

OED

WKP

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Etymology of chameleon

Posted by Johannes on 19 February 2011

Origin of the word chameleon
The word chameleon comes from the Latin chamaeleon, which is a transliteration of the Greek chamaileon from chamai (on the ground; Gr: χαμαί] + leon [lion; Gr: λέων].

 

In modern Greek:
a) hameleon: chameleon [Gr: χαμαιλέων]
b) hamo: on the ground [Gr: χάμω]
c) leon or liontari: lion [Gr: λέων or λιοντάρι]

OED
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