ENGLISH WORDS AND GREEK COGNATES.

Learn easily Greek via the linguistic relationships and the roots of the English words.

Posts Tagged ‘αγγλικές λέξεις με ελληνική προέλευση’

Etymology of cinema

Posted by Johannes on 3 April 2011

Origin of the word cinema .

The word cinema comes from the French cinéma, shortened from cinématographe, coined 1890s by Lumiere brothers, who invented it, from the Greek cinema (movement; better pronounced as kinima; Gr: κίνημα), from the verb cino (to move; better pronounced as kino; Gr: κινώ).
See also the post entitled “Etymology of cite” here.
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From the same root
English: cinematography, cinerama, cinemascope, kinetics, kinematics, kineto
French: cinema, cinematographe,
Italian: cinematografo,
Spanish: cine, cinematica,
German: Kino, Kinematograph
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 In modern Greek:
a) cinema: cinema [Gr: σινεμά
b) kinima: movement [Gr: κίνημα]
c) cinimatographos (better pronounced as kinimatographos): cinema [Gr: κινηματογράφος]
d) kino: to move [Gr:κινώ]

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Etymology of cite

Posted by Johannes on 3 April 2011

Origin of the word cite

The verb cite (to summon) comes from the Latin citare, from ciere, from cieo (to move, set in motion, stir, move), which is related to the Greek verb cieo/cineo (I move, stir, rouse, summon; Gr: κιέω/κιώ/κινέω).

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From the same root: 

English: cinema, excite, incite, citation, recite, recital .

French: citer, citateur, inciter, reciter .

Italian: citare, citatire, incitare, recitare .

Spanish: citar, cita, excitar .

German: zitieren, Zitat .

In modern Greek: .

a) cino (better pronounced as kino): move [Gr: κινώ] .

b) cinisi (better pronounced as kinisi; remember the related word kinetics): movement [Gr: κίνηση] .

c) tsitato: citation, a part of a text with an important message [Gr: τσιτάτο; loanword] .

d) cinema: cinema [Gr: σινεμά; loanword] .

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OED

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Etymology of saliva

Posted by Johannes on 20 March 2011

Origin of the word saliva.

The word salivacomes from the Latin saliva (spittle), of unknown origin. Perhaps it is related to the  Greek sialon (saliva, spittle; Gr: σίαλον).
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From the same root:
English: salivation, salivary, salivate
French: salive, salivation, salivaire
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In modern Greek:
a) salio or sialos or sielos:saliva [Gr: σάλιο or σίαλος or σίελος]
b) sielogonos: salivary [Gr: σιελογόνος]
c) sielorrhea: salivation [Gr: σιελόρροια]
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