English Words of (Unexpected) Greek Origin.

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Etymology of Deus, deity, divine, adieu, diva, Jupiter, jovial.

Posted by Johannes on 24 May 2010

Origin of Deus, deity, divine, adieu, diva, Jupiter, jovial.
The etymology of Deus (God) is somehow controversial. Some etymologize it from the Greek Theos (God; Θεός), whereas others (Babiniotis etc) reject this etymology.
Most probably it derives from the Greek Aeolic form Deus (Δεύς) of Zeus (the genitive of Zeus is Dios).
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Jupiter (Juppiter): Zeus+pater: Zeus father.
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adieu: from the French phrase “a dieu (vous) commant”, that is “I commend (you) to God,” [a (to) + dieu (God)]. Similarly adios in Spanish (a+dios)
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divine: from the Latin divinus (of a god), from divus (dius) from the Greek dios (something/someone from Zeus, something/someone from God, divine; δίος).

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From the same root:

English: deify, divinity, deism, deity, divination, diviner, deicide, diva, jovial, joviality, Jovian
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French: dieu, deessee, divin, diviniser, divinite, deviner, deisme
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Italian: Dio, dea, diva, divino, divinita, divinizzare, devinare, deismo
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Spanish: Dios, diosa, divino, divinita, adivinar, deismo, divinidad
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German: Theisme
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In modern Greek (Romeika, the language of Romei/Romans/Ρωμηοί)
 
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a) Dias: Zeus [Δίας]
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b) Theos: God [Θεός]
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c) adio: goodbye (loan word from French) [αντίο]
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d) diva: diva (loan word from Italian) [ντίβα]
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Πλήθος αγγλικών λέξεων όπως deity (Θεότητα), divine (θε’ι’κός), divination (μαντεία) κλ καθώς και το γαλλικό adieu (αντίο) προέρχονται από την Αιολική μορφή Δεύς του Ζεύς.
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Post 143.
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JOT

Posted by Johannes on 5 August 2008

Etymology of jot

The noun JOT (the least part of something; a little bit; a small amount of) along with the verb JOT -usually fol. by down- (to write or mark down quickly or briefly; to make a short note of) derive from the Greek word iota, which is the letter -i-, the smallest letter in the Greek alphabet and is used metaphorically for the smallest thing.
From the same root: jot, jot down, not a jot or tittle, iota.

Το ουσιαστικό JOT (μικρή ποσότητα, ίχνος) καθώς και το ρήμα JOT (συνήθως ακολουθούμενο από το down: γράφω κάτι πρόχειρα, γρήγορα) προέρχονται από το ελληνικό γράμμα γιώτα (ι), το οποίο είναι το μικρότερο γράμμα του ελληνικού αλφαβήτου.

iota –> jota –> jot

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