English Words of (Unexpected) Greek Origin.

Learn easily Greek using the roots of the English words.

Etymology of cite

Posted by Johannes on 3 April 2011

Origin of the word cite

The verb cite (to summon) comes from the Latin citare, from ciere, from cieo (to move, set in motion, stir, move), which is a transliteration of the Greek verb cieo/cineo (I move, stir, rouse, summon; Gr: κιέω/κιώ/κινέω).

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From the same root: 

 English: cinema, excite, incite, citation, recite, recital .

French: citer, citateur, inciter, reciter .

Italian: citare, citatire, incitare, recitare .

Spanish: citar, cita, excitar .

German: zitieren, Zitat .

In modern Greek (Romeika): .

a) cino (better pronounced as kino): move [Gr: κινώ] .

b) cinisi (better pronounced as kinisi; remember the related word kinetics): movement [Gr: κίνηση] .

c) tsitato: citation, a part of a text with an important message [Gr: τσιτάτο; loanword] .

d) cinema: cinema [Gr: σινεμά; loanword] .

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Post 176.

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Note (transl. of French): citer (αναφέρω), citateur (απάνθισμα ρητών), inciter (προτρέπω), reciter (απαγγέλω)._

One Response to “Etymology of cite”

  1. This post couldnt be more precise…

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